Tag Archives: Zante

Around Cephalonia

The quay at Argostoli looking south towards the market and causeway.

After saying a fond farewell to the Heanes, we set about some jobs.  As soon as we were filled with water and provisioned up we set off for Vathi.  Once out in the bay around the Argostoli headland, we realised that the best sailing would be to the south, so changed our plan and headed down to Ay Nikolaos Bay, on the north east corner of Zante, one of our favourite places in the Ionian.

Looking North East from the beach at Ay NiKolaos, Zante.
Ian busy creating rope loops. His new favourite hobby.

We were helped by the delightful Costas and moored against the town quay.  However, strong-ish winds were pressing us against the concrete so we decided to anchor instead.  Costas whizzed out in his boat and offered us a mooring.  We swung there happily for two days in winds up to 28kts.  It is a gorgeous spot in the bay.  The water is crystal clear, and there is a nice walk south along the road overlooking the coastline.

Next stop was Sami back on Cephalonia.  We had hoped to be able to go alongside the large north quay but were allocated a spot near the root of the south mole which was a bit tight to get into and to put down enough chain.  We felt happier after our third attempt.  Neighbours helped with the lines and soon we were all set.

The light and stunning waters Lake Melisanni.

We paid for two nights here and organised car hire for the next day so that we could go and explore a little.  Next morning, we set off to see the semi underground Lake Melissani.  We walked down the tunnel towards a little rowing boat sitting there to take us on a short tour round the lake.  Who should be sitting in that very boat but friends Laura and Steve Brown our friendly Texan pals from Marina di Ragusa.  Now, that’s what I call serendipity.  (And we had parked next to them in the car park!)  We decided to hook up for the day and set off to Sami for our morning coffee.

Fancy seeing you here!! Steve and Laura Brown on Orontes II

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ian, Steve, Stavros and me in the lovely Faros Restaurant in Sami.

Our task in Sami was to find Stavros from Faros Restaurant on the front and say hello from The Two Gees.    We had a lovely chat with Stavros and gave him all Glen and Gwen’s news.

 

Looking north towards Assos on west coat Cephalonia.

We then drove to Myrtos beach and swam in the turquoise water beside a beach that looked to be made up of mint imperials.  On closer inspection they were perfectly rounded limestone pebbles, polished and smoothed by the constant wear from being dashed in the winter waves.

The breath-taking coastal road is cut into the steep slopes along the North Western side of Cephalonia and we swept along gasping at the colours and breathing in the heady scent of the island flowers and plants.

We dropped down to Assos and had a little wander around. Realising that we hadn’t had lunch we stopped off and enjoyed a shared mese dish and had a cold beer each  in the most heavenly of settings.  Assos is an almost enclosed bay surrounded by tree covered hills and prettily coloured houses running down to the shore.  There is a Venetian Fort on the headland to the west.  The village had an almost Cornish look to it.  It was a quiet and unassuming spot.

From here we headed our separate ways and wished Steve and Laura fair winds as they  head  towards the Corinth Canal in a few days.

That evening we had delicious lamb chops cooked on the barbecue at Faros restaurant and more chats with the laconic Stavros.

The next day we drove up into the hills to the south of Sami and were once again bowled over by the beauty of the island.

Go Greece!

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The Crucial Crew, Ragusa day out.

After our top week in the UK, we scooted back to Sicily, leaving Erin behind, as she had to attend interviews for ski season jobs.  We met up with Kim (Carnegie friend) and Ollie (Kim’s son) at Wetherby services and travelled with them to Ragusa where we met up with Sheena (Coo-eee!) (Another Carnegie chum).  This was to be the super crew to help us sail from Sicily to Kephalonia in one hit – three days and nights at sea.

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Ian, Sheena, Kim, Ollie, Sarah
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‘Taylor’ Swift
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Bowline tying lessons en route.

We had a fantastic crossing, great laughs and pleasant sailing on very convenient winds.  We had a stowaway for a small part of the trip…a swift, soon named Taylor, who came into the boat for a sleep and then, as suddenly as she had arrived, disappeared off in the vague direction of Africa.

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Doric lighthouse at the entrance to Argostoli, Kephalonia
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First sight and smell of Kephalonia – bliss.

We arrived in Kephalonia to be greeted by the most amazing smell wafting on the breeze from the island of cypress trees, rosemary and jasmine!  Gorgeous!  The church bells were peeling exactly as we sailed into the bay at Argostoli.

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Sheena, Sarah, Ian, Kim and Ollie.

We were soon tied up and jumped ashore to have a hearty breakfast in one of the many cafes.

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Town Quay at Argostoli where the loggerhead turtles come to feed everyday.

We walked down the quay to see the giant loggerhead turtles that frequent the bay. Simply stunning.  The conservation group were there telling us all about them.  www.wildlifesense.com

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What are ‘Neatness personnel’?

Erin flew in to Kephalonia for a holiday on board and we set off around the island.  (We met her at the airport and saw this interesting sign.)

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New crew – now with Erin too.

Leaving Argostoli we headed south.  Unable to get into the planned port of call on the south coast we had to divert to Zakinthos.  A fortunate diversion it proved to be.  Almost as soon as we arrived alongside, Kostas helped us tie up and offered us discount at his restaurant and hotel and Nicolas arrived on his tractor offering us tastes of his wares.  We ended up buying heavenly olive oil, wine, honey, feta, olives, dried sage, fresh bread, tomatoes and currants!  Perfect.

From there we headed north to Effimia on east Kephalonia.  We were bossed loudly into our berth on the town quay by an officious but efficient marinero/harbour master, who really knew his stuff.  He gave us our best lesson yet in mooring Med style with an anchor and lines to stern.

We pottered further north and stopped en route to swim and relax in a gorgeous bay.  The sea bream were out so grabbing my line and rod and stale bread supplies I set to catching fish.  img_1725Within seconds I had my first bite. Two fish at once.  In the next 30 minutes Erin and I had caught another three.  They were duly gutted, prepared, marinated, and cooked by Sheen, and eaten by us all for lunch.

Next stop was Fiscardo in the north.  We moored stern to the Northern part of the bay with long lines ashore.  And had an anxious time trying to get the anchor to bite and to get the lines ashore in a dinghy with a broken rowlock!

Sadly, after a couple of days relaxing andsic-keph-9 exploring the village, it was time to say goodbye to my mates
and then it was just the three of us again.