Tag Archives: Zakinthos

Now here’s a thought

Sarah has been away for ten days so I am taking up the blog writing baton.

I am moored up on Zakinthos town quay awaiting the arrival of Sarah and Keira. It’s a lovely place and as I sat watching the sun set this evening with a glass of wine in hand I contemplated my surroundings.

On my port side there is a beautiful looking yacht, it’s about 18m long and well equipped. On-board are a delightful couple, I am guessing they are late 60’s and obviously enjoying the rewards of their working life. They have just gone ashore to eat. They have unpronounceable Dutch names so let’s call them the Port Siders.

On my starboard side is a much smaller boat, about 9m in length, she looks very sea worthy and is probably quite exciting to sail, but she is a mature lady. On-board are a young family with two little girls, maybe 6 and 4. They are in Greece for the whole summer. At the moment dad and daughters are fishing off the back of the boat (a pointless exercise), all are obviously having fun. I can hear food being prepared, I hope they aren’t depending on the fish. Let’s call them the Starboard siders.

To buy and more importantly run an 18m yacht requires a lot of Euro’s. The winches on this boat will have cost more than we paid for Linea.  I am making some assumptions but the Port Siders must have worked extremely hard and been successful at accumulating cash. In my experience this requires a few sacrifices along the way, perhaps risking the family house to invest in the business, being a grumpy, tired git, long working days, business trips eating into week-ends, and, as I see often, a lengthy conference call or two whilst on holiday with the family.

Again making a few assumptions but I am guessing the Starboard siders have made a life choice to live for now. Taking the summer off to sail your old boat around Greece having fun with your kids doesn’t tend to go hand in hand with climbing the corporate ladder or accumulating lots of cash.

What nobody tells you when your children are 6 and 4 is how brief their childhood will be, how quickly they will become young adults and not be too enthusiastic to spend the entire summer with their parents.

I am wondering is a turn to port or starboard the better life?

Go Greece!

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The Crucial Crew, Ragusa day out.

After our top week in the UK, we scooted back to Sicily, leaving Erin behind, as she had to attend interviews for ski season jobs.  We met up with Kim (Carnegie friend) and Ollie (Kim’s son) at Wetherby services and travelled with them to Ragusa where we met up with Sheena (Coo-eee!) (Another Carnegie chum).  This was to be the super crew to help us sail from Sicily to Kephalonia in one hit – three days and nights at sea.

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Ian, Sheena, Kim, Ollie, Sarah
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‘Taylor’ Swift
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Bowline tying lessons en route.

We had a fantastic crossing, great laughs and pleasant sailing on very convenient winds.  We had a stowaway for a small part of the trip…a swift, soon named Taylor, who came into the boat for a sleep and then, as suddenly as she had arrived, disappeared off in the vague direction of Africa.

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Doric lighthouse at the entrance to Argostoli, Kephalonia
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First sight and smell of Kephalonia – bliss.

We arrived in Kephalonia to be greeted by the most amazing smell wafting on the breeze from the island of cypress trees, rosemary and jasmine!  Gorgeous!  The church bells were peeling exactly as we sailed into the bay at Argostoli.

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Sheena, Sarah, Ian, Kim and Ollie.

We were soon tied up and jumped ashore to have a hearty breakfast in one of the many cafes.

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Town Quay at Argostoli where the loggerhead turtles come to feed everyday.

We walked down the quay to see the giant loggerhead turtles that frequent the bay. Simply stunning.  The conservation group were there telling us all about them.  www.wildlifesense.com

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What are ‘Neatness personnel’?

Erin flew in to Kephalonia for a holiday on board and we set off around the island.  (We met her at the airport and saw this interesting sign.)

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New crew – now with Erin too.

Leaving Argostoli we headed south.  Unable to get into the planned port of call on the south coast we had to divert to Zakinthos.  A fortunate diversion it proved to be.  Almost as soon as we arrived alongside, Kostas helped us tie up and offered us discount at his restaurant and hotel and Nicolas arrived on his tractor offering us tastes of his wares.  We ended up buying heavenly olive oil, wine, honey, feta, olives, dried sage, fresh bread, tomatoes and currants!  Perfect.

From there we headed north to Effimia on east Kephalonia.  We were bossed loudly into our berth on the town quay by an officious but efficient marinero/harbour master, who really knew his stuff.  He gave us our best lesson yet in mooring Med style with an anchor and lines to stern.

We pottered further north and stopped en route to swim and relax in a gorgeous bay.  The sea bream were out so grabbing my line and rod and stale bread supplies I set to catching fish.  img_1725Within seconds I had my first bite. Two fish at once.  In the next 30 minutes Erin and I had caught another three.  They were duly gutted, prepared, marinated, and cooked by Sheen, and eaten by us all for lunch.

Next stop was Fiscardo in the north.  We moored stern to the Northern part of the bay with long lines ashore.  And had an anxious time trying to get the anchor to bite and to get the lines ashore in a dinghy with a broken rowlock!

Sadly, after a couple of days relaxing andsic-keph-9 exploring the village, it was time to say goodbye to my mates
and then it was just the three of us again.