Tag Archives: yacht

Passage Preparation

IMG_3234[1]After two glorious weeks in Port de Soller Mallorca, we set off for our new anchorage.  An email from friend and fellow sailer from landlocked Wharfedale, has prompted me to jot down a little of what we do in preparation for a trip out.

A couple of days beforehand we look at various weather forecasts.  (Although we are looking at the forecast everyday even if we are parked up or at anchor) They all seem to be slightly different so we kind of judge the average of them all, particularly in terms of wind speeds and direction.

Using this prediction, we can access how easy a sail may be to where we want to head.

We would rather not beat into the wind if possible, preferring to wait until the wind is blowing the right way!  Also, I would prefer that the winds are manageable in strength, so up to 20kn being about my limit in terms of comfort zone.  Often, we have found that if the predicted wind speed is 20kn, once you are out there it is usually much more!!!   If it’s going to be blowing a hoodie, then we’d rather stay in port!

So, having settled on a destination which would be within range, say 25 – 50nm, we plot a course on the open CPN navigation software; putting in various way points and checking the entire route in close up for any potential hazards.

We look at the destination port in the pilot guide and take a note of the course to follow for safe entrance.    Checking the things to look out for on the headland and mouth of the harbour.  We have the Navionics App ready on the phone so we can see the plan of the marina.

In addition, we check tides and currents, if necessary, and generally make a note of Barometer readings the previous day and evening.

I always like to have a plan B just in case the wind changes and the original destination becomes more difficult to enter.  Sometimes we have to have a plan C as well!  I write down this plan in RYA fashion with a little drawing of the destination port, etc.

I open up a new ships log on the computer and fill in as much detail as I can about the weather, (from forecasts and observations) barometer, temperature, humidity, provisioning plan, etc.

Once that stuff is complete really it’s practical preparations of the boat and crew.  A visit to the shower block ashore, last minute provisioning, back to the boat, shore shoes sprayed with cockroach killer so we don’t bring the nasty little critters’ eggs aboard inadvertently. Boat shoes on, breakfast, tidy up, teeth.

Life jackets are stowed on deck in a locker, MOB alarms are worn, shoes are on feet as there have been injuries when sailing in bare feet, factor 30 (soon to be 50) sun cream is applied, jackets are to hand, binoculars on deck and water bottles filled.

We have already done the provisioning, filled the water and diesel tanks.

After our experience with the sail drive and head gasket we now complete a daily engine check (WOBBLE) and also one once we are underway.

Below decks we stow all moveable items in lockers or on deep shelves, etc, and shut all doors or pin them back.  We close and lock all hatches and lock off the heads, after we had a flooded forward head one day.

Ian switches all the instruments on; AIS which transmit our position, speed, heading and also receives the same information about other vessels in the area; VHF is tuned to Channel 16; wind, depth, speed, navigation and autopilot instruments are activated. The course is activated on Open CPN and the first waypoint is sent to the navigation instruments at the helm.  The MOB alarm is switched on.

Then we come on deck and put the engine on so it can be warming up.

We take sail covers off, attach the main halyard and check that everything we’ve moved whilst in port is back in the right place.  For example, we always put the main halyard on something so that it doesn’t clank the mast all night.  We also attach one of the preventers on the boom to the breast cleat so that the boom doesn’t squeak as the boat rocks.

Next, we stow the fenders down stairs (until we find a locker space on deck).

Now, it’s time to lift up the anchors.  When in Soller, we deployed a kedge anchor off the stern  in addition to the main anchor because we wanted to be kept facing into the swell which comes into the bay.  Also, other boats around us were moored up to two mooring buoys so we didn’t have the space to swing at anchor.  (It would have been uncomfortable in any case!)  Once the kedge anchor is recovered and stowed, we attach and hoist the dinghy and finally, lift and fix the main anchor.   Then the anchor ball comes down and the motoring cone goes back up.

Then we motor out of the port giving a jaunty wave to new friends who we are sure to meet up with again soon.

We check that the course has been sent up to the console at the helm and I make the second entry in my shop’s log noting the time of departure.

When possible I try to make an entry in the log every time we change the sails, or tack or when I remember, or when I am below decks.

So, there you go, Nick Chown, all recorded for you.  We don’t have paper charts for this area which is a shame, because I prefer to use them and see the whole route in detail.  It’s also good to be able to plot your positions on it regularly as a back up to electronic stuff.

From starting to lift anchors, etc it was at least 45 minutes ’til we motored out of the bay.  It would have been longer but luckily the dinghy winch decided that it would continue to work just long enough to pull up the dinghy on to the davits after a teasing halt to its smooth action. Another thing to add to the repair list that grows on a daily basis!

As for parking…that’s a whole other story!!!

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Well Deserved Coffee Time

Ceuta to Mallorca Part 3

Planning for our longest single trip yet…and knowing that we had David Heane, maiden voyager extraordinaire, arriving to assist once more, we intended to provision at the nearby Mercadona supermarket.  Unfortunately, it took us hours and miles of walking due to catching the wrong bus!

Anyway, we finally arrived back at the boat (by taxi) and unloaded just in time for David’s arrival. Before any beers could be opened we had a serious job to complete.  The fitting of the fog horn.   (Foghorn, Leghorn!).  David and I

View from the top
View from the top

hauled Ian up the mast to the first set of spreaders, a second time so he could fit the refurbished fog horn.  But this time he also wanted to be pulled all the way to the top of the mast so that he could inspect it completely.  A lot of effort for David.  I was on the safety lines.

 

Job done!

Beers were opened but not too much as we had to be up at 0430 to leave enough time to get to Ibiza so we could rendezvous with Angela.

We negotiated the busy fishing area outside Altea.  By sunrise we had passed most of the fishing craft around us.  We had a good days sailing, even Genevieve made an appearance but she broke her shackle around the bowsprit so had to be put away again!  But whilst she was up, we saw dolphins on about three occasions.  Large pods of them that came to play around the bow.  It was fantastic to see them.  We arrived in San Antonio, Ibiza at about 1730.  Our first impressions were good.

We were tied up in a nice space near the toilets and the Capitania.  David and I had put the boat to bed before Captain Moulding came back from booking in, with his free handy zippable folder, useful lanyard and, most importantly, drinks vouchers.

We spruced ourselves up and set off for the bar.  Three beers and three cavas later we headed back to the boat for dinner.   Next day, would be a quick hop round the island to Sant Miquel where we were to pick up Angela.

We arrived early afternoon and anchored over sand.

Sant Miguel anchorage
Sant Miguel anchorage

We took the dinghy to the beach to suss it out and peruse the menu of a beach front restaurant – possibly one of the the most expensive ever! And then we were back at the boat for tea.   Sleep by 2130 so that we would have a few hours kip before Angela arrived from her flight to Ibiza.  The boys got up to go and collect her from the beach. The taxi driver was most perturbed to be leaving her alone on the beach at 0130.  She assured him that the lights heading to shore were indeed coming to collect her.

We were up and at ’em by 0500 hrs and off to Mallorca in a very wallowy sea; whether motoring or sailing.  We made fair progress.  Mostly motoring because of the swell.  We arrived in Andratx in the afternoon and parked on the floating pontoon stern to next to a friendly Frenchman.  No sign of the Ports IB marineros so we set off to the bar and were delighted to meet the gang from T’Shire.  The Daggets and The Vyvyans.  How special!

We had made it!  790 miles over the course of 7 weeks.  They had provided the incentive to arrive at a certain place by a certain time and we had done it!

 

The Hokey Cokey boat….. in, out, in, out…

Apparently my writing isn’t as good as Sarah’s so I have gone for a more visual format. Continue reading The Hokey Cokey boat….. in, out, in, out…

Routine

Well, just in case you think this adventure is all about G and Ts on the deck before the sun has even gone over the yardarm, I thought I’d fill you in on the general daily sailing routine on board Linea.

First, obvs, Ian brings me a cup of tea and immediately my first work-out commences.  Twenty vigorous pumps up and down and I can feel the pressure mount.  Some lubrication is necessary.  We use olive oil on the advice of other seafarers. Suddenly, flushing is a lot easier and the toilet (heads!) is squeaky clean.  Frantic, but necessary exercise and then we have breakfast!

We set off to shower in the marina shower block, if there is one, and, afterwards, I go to the marina office to return the key and go through the obligatory paperwork. (At least eight pieces of paper,  sometimes twelve!). Since the offices are at the arrival pontoon this usually involves a fair hike to and fro.

Whilst I have been away, Ian has been checking all the weather reports.  It’s no good just checking the one, since the weather is so unpredictable in the Med at this time of year and each one predicts slight differences.  We take the average and add ten knots!

He has re-attached the main sail halyard and unzipped the sail cover.  The navigation has been done the night before, putting all the crucial waypoints into the computer so that we have a clear course to follow.  We have the paper charts and pilot guide to hand, having read up, in detail, about where we are heading, obstacles along the way and the destination port.

Whilst waiting to depart we hear a Pan Pan message going out on the VHF radio to all ships in the Straits and Alboran sea. There is a dinghy adrift with 50 souls on board and we are asked to keep a sharp look out and report any sightings.  We gasp at the thought of people being stranded in those waters with no means to steer or propel themselves in such a busy traffic area.  Hopefully they will soon be found and taken to safety. These messages have become a daily occurrence.

Gathering ourselves together, we remove the heavy mooring lines from the bow and any spring lines we have set up.  Once we are ready, we start the engine and Ian drops the stern mooring line.  I then pull in the slip lines and we back out carefully from our spot trying to avoid the mooring lines of other boats next to us.

‘Clear!’ I yell, and off we go out of the marina.  My first job is to remove all the lines and coil them up to be stowed. For short slip lines this is relatively easy, but lifting and coiling heavy mooring lines presents serious weight lifting for the arms

I carry them back to the rope locker tucked in the curve of my elbow and lying across my hip, like naughty babies and gently lie them in the locker until they are needed again.

Then, I undo all the fenders – one by one – that’s usually eight, sometimes nine.  I carry them to the cockpit and lob them bodily down the companionway.  Next, I have to climb gingerly down to the saloon and push the fenders under the table, wedging them in like sausages in a Tupperware box.

Back up on deck, I check that the cockpit is ready for the hoisting of the sails.  Reef lines (three of them) need to be placed in even figure of eights so that they uncoil without interruption.

The main halyard needs winding round the main winch in preparation for hauling up.  The topping lift needs winching in tight, the vang needs releasing, as does the main sheet.

Soon, we decide the time is right for the main sail to go up.  I head the boat up to wind so that her nose is dividing the air neatly and evenly.  Ian stands at the mast.  I engage Pedro the auto pilot and dart to my position near the halyard.  Ian sweats the halyard, I pull in the slack. Teamwork! So we go on, until the main sail is almost at the top of the mast.  I then begin to winch in a centimetre at a time!  Ian appears from the mast and continues.  Then takes the helm to turn us away from the wind.   He urges me to winch a little more.  I make a tiny adjustment, which he accepts as ‘fantastic’ and, thank god, the thing is up.

No rest yet.  I then have to pull the Genoa as Ian releases the furler and finally we have both sails up!  Still more tweaking to do, so that they are set and I can sit.  But not for long.  This has probably taken the best part of an hour.

All the while we are both keeping an eagle look out, using our fantastic binoculIMG_3067ars (affectionately called ‘knockers’) for Cardinal marks, lobster pots, fish farms, other boats, dolphins and huge pieces of floating plastic sheeting that can blow off the thousands of huge ‘greenhouses’ along this south facing part of the Spanish coast line.

After being head to wind for so long it is also necessary to check where we are in relation to our course and the chart. I nip down below and look at the Open CPN navigation charts on the computer.

I send the latest activated waypoint information to the helm.

Back up top I go to see how we are getting on.

Perhaps now it’s calm, it’s a good opportunity to pop to the loo, (sorry- heads!) and it is, of course,at this precise moment, that a huge pod of dolphins decides to make an appearance.  Ian shouts with delight.  I rush up top with the camera and glimpse loads of dolphins in small groups chasing and herding the fish and having a feast but quite far off.  There are a number of seagulls flying along in their wake.  They have discovered that where there are dolphins there surely must be fish.

The dolphins do not grace us with any close up, dip-diving today.

Pedro and Genevieve
Pedro and Genevieve

Surely, it’s coffee time now.  I go back down and put the kettle on.  Coffee and biscuits appear, as if by magic, in the cockpit and we have a quiet minute whilst Pedro carefully steers us along our course.

Suddenly, Ian is digging in the locker for the stainless steal polish.  He sets to, polishing and buffing, around the boat.

Not to be outdone, I decide that this is a good time to start pulling the new dark blue nylon socks onto our scruffy old fenders.  Back down the steps I go to retrieve the sewing stuff.  Pulling the socks over the fenders requires remarkable strength and is akin to pulling tights up wet legs!  Once they are in position, an over-stitch with shearing elastic creates a rope effect and keeps the collar and cuff of each sock in place on the fender.  They do look smart!

The wind remains light and constant, so we decide to get out the mackerel fishing line.  We are sailing over a fishing haven and there are bound to be fish.

Ian dangles the hooks and feathers over the side and within five minutes, he has a bite.  He pulls in the line to reveal the  smallest, spikiest fish I have ever seen.  I put on the gloves and detach the fish from the hook and chuck it back in.  Poor thing looks the worse for the experience.  Having detached the minnow, I throw the lead weight back into the sea,  but Ian has only a light hold of the rest of the line so the whole thing is jerked out of his hand and we watch it drop to the bottom of the ocean, helplessly.

Well, that’s the end of fishing, for the time being but there’s no peace for the wicked!

The wind is picking up and we decide to put the main sail away and use just the headsail as we are on a run and the wind is right behind us.  (It’s safer and a lot easier to put away if the wind builds further.) We turn into the wind, which by now has increased to more than 20 knots, and release the halyard.  The sail drops down almost entirely into the sail bag, just needing a hand to fold in the last metre or two.

We sail along at about 8 knots.  It’s relatively peaceful on this point of sail and we are well-balanced.  I rustle up a quick lunch.

The arrival port is in sight.

Then the foresail needs pulling in.  Ian does the winching and I ease the genoa sheet so that the sail doesn’t get tangled around the forestay.

Then the engine goes on,  and we are motoring towards our destination.  I edge my way along the boat to pull up the motoring cone, which lets other boats know that we are motoring.  Once that is done it’s time to put out the fenders, ready for parking.  I have to go down to the saloon and push all the fenders back up on deck.  I climb up behind them and push them into the cockpit and emerge like a hatchling amongst eggs.

One by one, I carry them down the side of the boat and tie them on to the rail.  Back and forth I go, methodically.  Next, it’s time to get the lines ready for mooring.  Usually we need a stern line from the back of the boat and a bow line at the front.  I dig them out of the snake pit and scurry around to attach and coil them so that they are ready to throw to the Mariners who are on shore. Of course by now it’s blowing a hoollie to bring added spice to our manoeuvres and I know within thirty of minutes of turning the engine off there won’t be a breath of wind.

Whilst Ian calmly steers the boat against the Arrivals Pontoon, I prepare to fling the lines ashore and onto the outstretched arm of the patient mariner. He attaches the rope to the shore and hands me back the end of the line.  I pull this through the fairlead and on to the cleat as quickly as possible so that the boat can’t drift.  As soon as that line is fixed I move to the bow and repeat the process so that we are balanced.  We both breath a sigh of relief and whilst Ian sorts the paperwork out with the Marina Office, I have a quiet five minutes.

Now that we have been allocated a berth we will have to perform the parking exercise all over again.  I fix another bow line.  We untie from the waiting pontoon and motor on over towards our berth.  We usually go bows to with a concrete pontoon because with the dinghy on the stern it means that it is impossible to climb off the boat when the tide drops.

I fling the bow lines again and fix them.  Then I reach back to grab the boat hook and lean over the side of the boat to scoop up the lazy line and take it back to the stern so that Ian can heave up and cleat off the hefty mooring line to which the lazy line is  clinging.

Phew, we are all sorted!  No not quite.

I lug the huge mooring lines, that I put away this morning, back up to the bow and throw the ends to Ian who attaches them to the bollards on shore.  They will take most of the weight of the boat, rather than the thin slip lines which are easier to throw but not as strong.

Then we tighten everything up, Ian ‘sweats’ in the line and I pull in the slack and tie it off.  Knuckles are at risk of rubbing raw against the rough surface of the deck, fingers can be trapped by the force of the lines and we are still not done.

The halyard has to be pinned away from the mast so that it doesn’t clank in the wind and keep everyone awake.  The sail cover must go on to protect the sail from rain and ultraviolet light.   All the lines from the sails must be tidied up and placed in figures of eight around the winches or coiled on the rail to keep them neat.

The wheel is covered with its canvas cover and everything that can be stowed away, is.

Now, and only now, can the kettle be put on for a well deserved cuppa and a quick shower.

But, hang on….we were alongside the Arrivals pontoon at 1500hrs.  How can it be 1820hrs already?

We need to cook some supper and then it’s nearly time for bed!!

Anyone interested need only make the briefest of brief applications to be crew on our next leg!

Buying a boat – it’s all about compromise

We have come to learn that buying a boat is all about compromise. A centre cockpit boat generally has a large aft cabin with a queen size bed you can get out of either side, but the cockpit tends to be smaller; mass production boats such as Beneteau are lighter therefore better in the light winds of the Med and Caribbean but less than optimal in big seas; longer boats, more living space but higher marina fees and bigger sail area to handle when short-handed; and so it goes on. Of course, for us, price was also a big consideration.  Continue reading Buying a boat – it’s all about compromise