Tag Archives: Skiathos airport

Mamma Mia

The next morning, we set about delivering laundry and provisioning up.  We left at about midday for Skopelos, the island where some of Mamma Mia was filmed.  We arrived in a large bay on the west coast but after trying to anchor unsuccessfully decided to go in a secluded inlet off to the south and took a long line ashore.  Soon it was beer o’clock.  What a lovely quiet spot – oh, apart from a noisy bunch of Romanians larking about and having fun!  How very rude!!

The wind was good from the south the following day so we had a fantastic run to the northern tip of the island and then tacked down the eastern flank.  We were in strong winds so couldn’t stop to take pictures of the headland with the church at the top of hundreds of steps where the wedding scene was filmed but the whole thing put us in the mood for watching the film as we listed to the score and sang along with all the tunes.

‘Do you think that’s it?’ Alice asked me casually, as we approached the headland from afar and were trying to pick it out from its backdrop through the binoculars.

‘I do, I do, I do!  I replied.  Which set us off – hooting hysterically.

Ah, little things…

We had a great dinner out and a leisurely start in the morning -this time aiming to close the circle and set of up the west coast again.  We parked up in a little harbour called Nea Klima.  It looked like a nice place, however, the constant slop from the waves rolling right in the mouth of the harbour would make for a noisy and uncomfortable night so we returned to the same inlet from the other night.  There was a bit more of a performance this time getting parked up but it was all good practice and I am now more confident about using the dinghy and tying up lines and bringing them back to the boat as Ian reverses in.  I dare say that we could even manage to do it with just the two of us.  But for now it was luxury to have Ian and Alice’s help and support.

On the Thursday morning, we set off back to Skiathos and arrived early enough to find a place on the town quay.  All too soon it was time to say goodbye to Alice and Ian.  They headed off to the airport after kindly helping us with laundry collection and shopping, including the purchase of a huge new gang plank from a Greek version of Merrit and Fryers.

Massive jet coming in to land on the shortest runway in Europe.

Ian checked the recently occupied cabin and found Daggett items.  So, we wandered round to the bottom of the airport runway, a mere kilometre from the quay as they walked down from the airport and we met in the middle.  Just in time to witness a plane come in to land literally metres from our heads.

Watch out for flying stones!

As if that wasn’t excitement enough, there, minutes later, coming straight at us down the runway was a plane preparing to leave.   After a neat pirouette it faced away from us into the oncoming wind.  We, along with about forty other onlookers were standing there taking selfies and holding up cameras to record the take off.  I wimped out and walked back a few meters to hide in a drive way whilst the jet engines roared to life and the full force of their power could be felt as a blast of hot air, sand, dust and small stones shot back over the people and pebble-dashed every one of them.

Back at the boat,  we met David and Sarah on Rozinante as they came in to a space beside us and we soon struck up conversation over a couple of beers.  We had a further three nights here enjoying the town, harbour and company.  We had yet more boat jobs to do.  The bowsprit that holds the genaker down had come adrift recently so we needed to try and find something substantial to hold it back in place.  Our kind neighbour David Beanie dug around in his useful bits and bobs box and came up with something that might just do the job – a huge bolt, complete with nuts.  Perfect.  From now on, in memory of Bob Monkhouse and the Golden Shot, between us (and maybe to his face) he will for ever be referred to as, ‘Beanie – the Bolt’!!