Tag Archives: Paros

Leaving Naxos after one month (Testing the engine)

Octopus drying on the quay in Naxos

We finally waved goodbye to harbourmaster father and son team Nikos and Makos in Naxos.  They wryly commented that we should have asked for the monthly mooring fee.  We returned to Paros.  We anchored in the south west part of the bay of Naoussa and enjoyed a fine afternoon swimming and snorkeling.  Erin spotted a beautiful starfish for us all to admire.

After a super calm night, we headed north in great winds to Finikas.  Arriving with a flurry of charter yachts, we were hoodwinked into thinking that the quay would be a good place to be overnight, despite forecasts of strong southerly winds in the night.  Foolish error!

We were awoken from fitful sleep by the grating noise of the spreaders and stays clashing with those of the neighbouring boat.  We managed to pull forward so that the rocking would be safer and went back to bed.  Ten minutes later, Erin shouted out, ‘Boat!’ in a tone of great alarm.  She had popped her head out of the forward hatch and to her amazement saw a charter yacht pinned across our bow at 0400h in the morning, in the dark!

We all dashed on deck to fend off this yacht.  Another departing yacht had tripped its anchor and so they were forced to leave in some haste.  On motoring out, they wrapped a rope round the propeller so they had no power.  Left to the devices of the strengthening wind, they were blown along the bows of the boats on the quay, stopping at us because they fouled their keel on our anchor chain.


After hours of fending, our anchor finally gave up and their keel was free. They continued to bounce along every single bow along the quay finally stopping about 2 metres from some rocks.  Ian helped them to get their anchor down and then they waited for the coastguard to arrive to tow them to safety.

Our massive stern fender was burst and numerous other damages were incurred in the night when the charter yacht hit us.

In the meantime, we were all busy on Linea.  First, we pulled the anchor as tight as it would go.  Then, we kept the engine on in case we need to motor forwards at all.  We tried to limit the damage as much as possible whilst this boat was pressing us back against the quay. Tthe swell was lifting us higher than the quay and it is a miracle that the rudder didn’t get damaged.  Josh was doing sterling fending off with the popped fender.

Ian eventually came back to the boat and we decided that since it was almost dawn and we were not happy with our anchor we would leave.  The boat on our starboard side had to leave first since their anchor chain was lying right over ours.  We motored to the anchorage on the other side of the bay.

After a few hours nap we were beginning to see the humorous side of the story.  We still couldn’t quite believe all that had happened during the night.  We were mightily relieved not to have incurred more damage.  The boat next to us had not been nearly so lucky; having its stern constantly smashed into the quay.

Josh and Erin chilling on the deck

We moved on to the practically deserted island west of Mykonos and had a wonderful night in a perfect cove with Delos in the distance.  A beautiful place to calm the nerves.

On Wednesday we set off to Mykonos, as Josh and Erin had bought fantastically cheap flights back to Manchester from there.  (£38 each)  We anchored in the bay south of town and sat out the evening’s strong winds.

There was time for some last minute hair braiding and back gammon championships.

Next day, we caught a bus to explore the lanes, whitewashed churches and bijoux shops in town.  We walked round to meet up with Stephen and Gilly for a swift beer and to catch up on their island-hopping adventures.

It was a pleasant wander round Little Venice, past the windmills and up and down the steps on the hill.  The town was thronged with doddering cruise ship passengers.

During the very wet journey back to the boat to collect bags,  we saw yet another inflatable toy somersaulting across the bay.  We managed to catch it and the girls were very happy with their swan (Susan).  All too soon, it was time to bid a fond farewell to Erin and Josh.  They headed to the airport and we went back for another windy night in Ormos Ornos.

During the last few days, we have switched the engine on and off a total of eight times and all seems to be well.  We are gradually gaining more confidence that the fuel is clean and the pipes are clear.  Phew!

Continuing the engine saga!

 

The good news is that we welcomed Keira, Erin and Josh on board when they arrived on Naxos on the 1st September.  Keira and Erin completing their mammoth overland journey from China to Europe with the ferry ride from Athens.  Read all about their amazing adventures on www.twigletandnoodletravels.wordpress.com .

After the high pressure pump was analysed,  reconditioned and refitted, the engine appeared to be working well.  We had tried it in neutral in the marina but had not yet worked the engine under load for the ultimate test.  Reluctant to go out and risk engine failure in strong meltemi winds, we persuaded ourselves that we may as well stay in Naxos until the girls arrived.  We had a good couple of sociable evenings with Chris and Izzy on Mutch, admiring their new Nauticat that they had just bought in Kos.

The girls arrived on one of the large Hellenic Seaways ferries; one of 28 daily ferries.  The wash created by the Fast Sea Cat Champion Jet ferries when they come in and spin round at high speed, sends a series of surge waves which curl and ricochet around the outer wall of the harbour and hit the boats on the pontoon in a domino effect, causing alarming rocking and rolling.  We were parked right by a very solid lamp post and our gang plank came up against it and was damaged.

On Saturday, we met up with Stephen and Gillian Hodgson who joined us from Mykonos.  Unfortunately, they arrived without their luggage which was somewhere in Manchester airport.

We had a very pleasant evening out with them on the roof top at Oniro restaurant up in the Hora. 

Next day, we set off to the south of Naxos to put the engine to the test.  Typically, the wind was blowing from the south so we had to motor all the way.  The bad news was, that Ian noticed that there was some diesel leaking out of the engine but couldn’t identify where it was coming from.   We motored the whole way (4 hours)  to Ormos Kalados at the bottom of Naxos and anchored off.  Stephen and Gilly hired a buggy and set of on an adventure down the island to meet us there.  They booked a room at Kalados studios.  It is a rural and remote spot with sheep regularly strutting up and down the beach and donkeys and horses grazing in the fields.  We had been told about a fabulous rustic restaurant above the harbour where you could get barbecued lamb chops and fabulous veggies.  We had a fantastic meal there, and, although the wine was rough and cloudy, it didn’t stop us drinking rather too much of it!

We ferried Stephen and Gilly back to their end of the long and deserted beach and crashed out. Unfortunately, even the copious quantities of wine we had consumed couldn’t help us sleep in the swell that crept in during the night on the southerly wind!  We were bobbing about badly all night.

Next morning, we decided that we ought to set off back to Naxos town to get the leak looked at.  We were pleased that the wind was still southerly.  It would be a nice sail back up.  As soon as we rounded the headland to take us into the Paros/Naxos Straits, we saw lots of other yachts ahead. They were heading south under head sails only.  Strange? How could they also be sailing on a southerly wind?  Ah!  Wait a moment the wind has changed….we have 14k on the nose, as per usual.  So, we motored and the engine seemed to be doing well despite the leak.

We were barely a mile from the marina entrance, just passing between an area of rocks jutting from the headland, literally the most dangerous spot in the entire area, when the engine spluttered and died!  OH! GREAT!

We quickly deployed the head sail and sailed away from the danger towards the top of Paros.  There was a shocked silence amongst the crew.   I guess we were all wondering how we would get back into the marina without an engine.

We sailed and contemplated the situation.  After about 30 minutes, when the engine had cooled a little, Ian and Keira went to peer in the engine room.  Ian managed to bleed the airlock out and miraculously the engine started again.  We all breathed a huge collective sigh of relief!  We motored back into the marina.  Stratos, the engineer, returned in the morning to further investigate.  We have discovered that the fourth fuel injector is slightly corroded.  It leaks very slightly and,  when the fuel is compressed within, a very fine mist of diesel is ejected, which makes seeing precisely where the leak is coming from particularly difficult.  (Although the leak doesn’t affect the performance of the engine when it is running, as soon as the engine is stopped the air can get in and engines do not like air bubbles inside them!)

Stratos sorted the injector and advised replacing it over the winter.  Phew!  Job done.  Beach day, well and truly deserved and drinks with Stephen and Gilly before heading home to cook up a huge curry.

Next day, we left the marina at about noon and had a lovely sail down to the south of Paros to Ormos Aliki.  (Which was precisely where Stephen and Gilly had just booked into a hotel for the night, unbeknownst to us!)  We were just motoring up to the delightful looking anchorage when the engine stuttered and slowly died – again!  Bloody hell!

We put the head sail back out and sailed about whilst deciding what was best to do.  Concluding that it would be best to get back to Naxos, we set off at 1515h tacking into the wind.  Luckily, the wind was quite strong so we made good progress.  We arrived in Naxos bay, rounding the Vrak Fournos rock and wreck in six hours.  The plan was to sail directly into the anchorage to the north of the marina.  We had actually managed to start the engine again but couldn’t rely on it giving power so we sailed in on a close haul with the boom out ready to drop the main.  Once we were behind the breakwater, we dropped the main and used the head sail only to power us further in.  Immediately we were in position, we let the headsail flap and put the anchor down as the wind pushed us back.  Just for the added challenge we had to do all this in the dark…luckily there was a full moon to light the way!

We were well set!  Mightily relieved, we put the boat to bed and had a welcome beer.  We soon rustled up some chilli and had an enjoyable dinner down below because it was surprisingly cold on deck.

In the morning, we motored into the marina with Josh motoring beside us in the dinghy as back up in case the engine failed again.  Nikos, the Harbourmaster, was joking with us that we should ask him for the annual rate for mooring.   Stratos returned once again and pumped out the fuel, filtered it, changed all the fuel pipes and cleaned the tank out.  There must have been debris in the tank that stopped the fuel from being delivered to the engine.

He has already found one solidified pellet of liquid gasket (a kind of blue tack used to seal things) and believes there might be more.  He has also found other bits of debris in the fuel tank and coating the sides of the fuel pipes.

This does seem to be progress.  Stratos assures us that the engine is fine; and now that he has cleaned the fuel there should be no further problems.  With each successful outing we gain more confidence that the engine will not let us down. On the plus side; we have learnt such a lot and had our sailing skills further tested.

It has been a bit of a baptism of fire for the girls and Josh and I have been more than a little anxious to have all my eggs in one basket!  At the same time, it has been lovely and comforting to have help on board and we are proud to see how well they have coped with all the excitement.

Naxos and Paros with friends and faaaamily!

As soon as we arrived we deployed the dinghy and Ian went to the jetty at Agia Annas to collect the Hill-Cable gang.  They all came back to the boat and Sam and Louis were soon jumping in and defying each other to do more and more intrepid leaps off the boat.  Sam, who had stayed with us in June, was in charge of showing everyone around and explaining the use of the heads!!

We enjoyed a few chilled beers with everyone and I loved showing Sarah and Paddy around Linea.

They headed off to freshen up and and we all met up later for dinner.  Deciding to wander up towards Prokopios we came across an open air cinema showing Zorba the Greek.   It was an interesting film with a young Alan Bates in the lead role and Anthony Quinn as Zorba. It was fascinating to see Crete of old and to learn of the harsh amoral ways of the society then.

The following day Louis was poorly and so Paddy and Sam came out to the boat to chill for the afternoon as the wind was picking up and we didn’t really want to leave her.

My pal Jane, who I used to work with at Malsis, arrived to stay for a few days.   She was thrown right in at the deep end with a trip to the cinema to see Mamma Mia with Bryn and Jill. We all had a good sing!

Next day, Paddy and gang were heading off to Paros.  Jane and I took a bus trip to Naxos town and had a lovely afternoon wandering around the Chora… me reminiscing about the time I spent a night sleeping in the park there with my friend Stephanie Minto in 1979!  (Don’t tell Ivan and Carol!)

 

We were just heading out of the bus station when i heard a familiar voice.  I turned to look and recognised Nikos, whom we had worked for at Powder White during our ski season.  It was quite an extraordinary coincidence as a couple of seconds either way and I would not have seen him. 

On the Sunday, we set sail for the north part of Paros to a wonderful anchorage with safety from winds from any direction.  We anchored in the NE side of the bay and it was stunning despite the power station far off on the south coast of the bay.  Unfortunately, it was a long and exposed dinghy ride to and fro the beach where Paddy and gang were.

Nevertheless, we did manage for them to come to the boat for a day, and for Louis to stay over and watch the meteor shower with us.  We had a good walk along the shore, some snorkelling, a bit of beach time and an exploration of the marina and town of Naoussa.

The town is a lovely jumble of alleyways and squares.  The marina is an interesting place with lots of anchor knitting and big motor yachts taking up a lot of the space.   We decided that we would have to stay at anchor.

We spent lovely, all too few days with the family.  Paddy and gang were due to depart on the Wednesday from Mykonos so we dragged ourselves away just after the sun had gone down and the wind picked up and set off across the bay to the boat, waving a fond farewell as we went.

We were happy to get back to boat after a thorough drenching in the dinghy in huge waves and in the dark!

Spotting a weather window we decided to sail back to Naxos on the Tuesday so that Jane could get back to Athens.  We had a fantastic, heeled over sail back from Paros to Naxos.   We sailed into the anchorage at 8.5kt.  The wind was over 35kts in the bay.  We put away the head sail and switched on the engine.  Just as we were just about to head up to the wind to get the main sail down the engine would not give any power.

Oh shit!  We were quite well into the bay and in reasonably shallow water so we put the anchor down and let out a lot of chain.  Ian went down to inspect the engine.  We were holding nicely. We let out even more chain, cause its better out than in!, and tried to fix the engine and get it started again. 

We took Jane ashore the following morning in relatively calm winds of 22kt. We had sailed only about 50 miles all week and spent most of the time with a load of random people she’d never met.  She handled all this brilliantly, as I knew she would, and we really enjoyed our week with her.   We hope you’ll come again, Jane.