Tag Archives: Marina di Ragusa

Storm bound in Monemvasia

The Gibraltar of the East. The rock of Monemvasia.

Having arrived in the sweltering heat it soon became apparent that Monemvasia didn’t want us to leave.  The wind changed to a strong Westerly, grew up into a boisterous teenager and went through full blown adolescence in the course of the following few days.

All our fenders deployed in fending us off the quay.
The eastern breakwater. Well protected but right up on the quay.

And so here we were.  Pinned against the harbour breakwater with gusts of up to 50 knots rocking us over and slamming the cutlery drawer open and shut in the throes of a proper teenage temper tantrum.  Thunder and lightning overhead have caused some yachts to lay chain from boat to sea bed to provide a possibility of earthing any strikes.  All of us have put our electronic items in the oven!

One night we all watched anxiously as two charter boats with a large group of Russians aboard demonstrated a Charter boat cha-cha in the middle of the night.  Poor things.  They ended up side-to the very end of the pontoon in howling winds after some impressive midnight maneuverings. 

 

 

 

The up side has been that we have met a great bunch of people.  Some waiting to head south, some, like us, to head east.

Trash Tuesday.

There have been; Brits, French, German, Dutch, Polish.  We have completed a Trash Tuesdays harbour plastic pick with everybody (Four large bags of plastic most of it in minuscule pieces, about 15kg in all) and had coffee and drinks on various boats.  There was a breakwater party one evening and a barbecue the next.  We have all been out for a meal to the T’Akrogiali taverna run by Tsakis, who is a delight, and whose Mama does all the cooking.

In between fending ourselves off the quay, we have had the chance to walk around the very pretty village of old Monemvasia (It is like a smaller and more rustic Dubrovnic) and do a circular walk around the jagged rock.  We have restocked our provisions, gas and water supplies.

 

We have seen the giant loggerhead turtles that frequent the bay daily.  They have distinct markings so we know it is the same two that return.  They gracefully swim around and pop up from time to time for a breath.  I was cutting Ian’s hair the other day whilst sitting on the back of the boat and one of them swam right under his toes. 

 

Tomorrow the wind will have died down a little which means that:

 

A) We can actually get off the quay

B) We can sail most of the way to Milos, due east of here.

Of course, we will have to come back this way in order to sail back to MdR in Sicily.  So far this year, despite the best laid plans, because of unfavourable winds, we have still seen very little of the Peloponnese, the Argolic gulf or the Saronic gulf.

 

 

Two months in ‘The Shire’. –

After winterising Linea (Bavaria 430 Lagoon) and leaving her safely tucked up in the Porto Turistico di Marina di Ragusa, Sicily, for a second safe winter; we set off for Longridge and caught up with June, Ian’s mum, and the rest of his family, which was lovely.

We arrived back in Linton, in the Yorkshire Dales National Park, a few days later, excited to see Keira freshly returned from a job in France; and already living and working at the Fountaine Inn, Linton.   We were soon to see Erin, too, as she was to travel up from London the following week.

We hit the ground running with a spate of socials and sessions.

 

Bryn and Jill fro ‘Fly the Coop’ who we managed to meet up with.

Soon, like everyone else, we were in full swing for Christmas.  Inevitably this involved more trips to the Fountaine Inn, Linton; and eating lots of food.

 

 

We did manage to fit in a good few walks when the weather was bright (and sometimes when it wasn’t!)  It was just lovely to be back in the Dale and experiencing village life again.

 

 

 

 

 

Erin had very little time off from her new job as Assistant Manager of the Miller and Carter Steakhouse in Worcester Park London, so she drove up north after her late shift had finished on Christmas Eve and arrived at 0200hrs in the morning!  A flying visit as she had to head back down south on Boxing Day morning.

We had a wonderful day on Christmas day culminating in an evening of hilarity at the Vyvyan’s.

We enjoyed a hearty walk and refreshments with the Heanes, Hodgsons and Plumbs in between Christmas and New Year but I was unable to muster the strength (due to being proper poorly) to join them all for the annual Inn at Whitewell walk from Chipping.

As predicted, time was flying on and we still had so much to do and so many people to see.

Happily, we were able to do a little farm, dog and house sitting which made a nice change.  Also, Ian was able to catch up and support his beloved Wharfedale Rugby Club.

I enjoyed going to the gym occasionally in a vague attempt to lose some of the weight I had piled on after a summer on the boat eating far too much feta cheese!

All in all, it was the most marvellous visit home, with added poignancy, since we haven’t been back for any length of time for almost two years.  We miss ‘The Shire’, our family and friends very much.

Remember, we would LOVE to welcome you to the boat during the summer if you fancy a bit of camping on water!  Please just ask and we will try to coordinate.

Next Time:  Keira heads off to Holland!

 

 

 

 

Back in ‘The Shire’.

An Aerial shot of the Porto Turistico Marina di Ragusa.

We pulled into our winter berth in the

Porto Turistico Marina di Ragusa, Sicily, without a hitch and were pleased to see friends and neighbours from last year.  Our arrival coincided with one of the twice weekly happy hours at the Stella Marina Bar so we met old and new friends that night.

 

ALl Italy Laser Championships in Marina di Ragusa

Some days later, the Porto Turistico hosted the All-Italy Laser Championships.   The first challenge was negotiating out from between the pontoons, heading for open sea.

Scrubbing the bottom of the tender clean; one of the many jobs to do.

Since arriving back, we have been full-on busy with boat jobs; fixing, replacing, renewing, cleaning, servicing, removing, repairing and storing.

 

 

We have had visits from Alice, Ian and Jon.  Unfortunately, we weren’t able to sail anywhere (even if the weather had been suitable) because the sails had already gone off to be repaired.

Ian, me and Jon above the stunning Ragusa Ibla.

However, we were able to explore more of Sicily.  Touring around to Syracuse, Modica, Scicli, Palazzallo Acredie and Ragusa Ibla – beautiful cities with stunning baroque churches and buildings.

A temple and huge bronze statue at Agrigento.

 

 

 

 

We also drove out to Agrigento to the Valley of Temples and were suitably impressed by the stunning Greek Temples there, which are some of the best preserved in the Med.

Visiting Agrigento – The Valley of Temples with Alice and Ian in our little Fiat 500!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Caltagirone National Park (Ancient Oak Forest) with the Kalura Walking group.

We joined a walking group and enjoyed a couple of noisy walks in the surrounding area with forty chattering Sicilians.

 

 

I also went olive picking again and have my own bottle of freshly pressed oil from my olives, ready to open in the spring.

Steve and Laura busy picking some of the 200kg we picked that day.

 

Kangaroo Sky above Pallazzallo Acredie

Ian welcomed back his road bike with open arms (thanks once again to Nick and Paul) and has been out on it a few times.  He reports that it doesn’t seem to be getting any easier each time.

Ian and Sheena. (Love how ancient columns are incorporated into newer buildings.)

We also enjoyed a few days in Rome, with my old friend Sheena and her family.  We walked all round Rome and saw all the main sights and some little hidden gems with our super guide Sheena, who has lived in Rome for 30 years.

Then, it was back to the boat for a few last minute preparations before heading back to the UK for a couple of months where,  for the first time in a while, all four of us Mouldings are to be in the same country at Christmas.

So, yes, we are going to be living back in Yorkshire.  Staying in a cottage – 26 Linton Falls until the 12th February 2018.

We hope to catch up with as many friends and family as we can.  Do pop in if you’re passing.

In the meantime, we wish you a merry Christmas and a very happy and healthy new year.

 

 

2017 – The Stats

Total nautical Miles 2488

Sailed miles 1212 –  49%;  Engine miles 1276   – 51%

Engine Hours 319;  Total nights at sea – 6                                                              Nights anchored – 92;  Nights on a town quay or in a marina – 72

Nights in the boat yard – 9

Our final crew, David and Michael.
Most frequent flyers!

Number of guests – 21 – Bill, David, Ang, Lizzie, Alice, Ian, Sam, Rory, Bryn, Jill, Louis, (plus the rest of the family for dinner and drinks,) Jane, Alice, Ian, Erin, Josh, Keira, David, Michael, Alice, Ian

 

Litres of wine consumed – Gallons!

Yacht A – 340million Euros to build. The masts are 90m tall.

Number of Super Yachts seen – 1 – to beat all

Days of sunshine – 168  Days of rain – 12

Deepest water  – 3600m;  Highest waves – 4m;   Strongest wind – 38kn

Hottest temp – 36;  Lowest temp – 24

Fish caught – NONE;  Dolphins seen – Lots;  Turtles seen – 2;  Star fish seen – 1

Pitta Gyros consumed – Far too many!!

Times up the mast – Ian Masta-Climbing;  me pulling!  11

Genaker out – 15

Number of boat mechanics met – 10 plus the crane driver

Our Yorkshire Flag after a season in the windy Cyclades!

Number of flags and pennants shredded – FOUR –  Greek flag, Cruising Association Pennant, British Ensign, Yorkshire Flag.

A memorable year!

 

 

 

 

Continuing the engine saga!

 

The good news is that we welcomed Keira, Erin and Josh on board when they arrived on Naxos on the 1st September.  Keira and Erin completing their mammoth overland journey from China to Europe with the ferry ride from Athens.  Read all about their amazing adventures on www.twigletandnoodletravels.wordpress.com .

After the high pressure pump was analysed,  reconditioned and refitted, the engine appeared to be working well.  We had tried it in neutral in the marina but had not yet worked the engine under load for the ultimate test.  Reluctant to go out and risk engine failure in strong meltemi winds, we persuaded ourselves that we may as well stay in Naxos until the girls arrived.  We had a good couple of sociable evenings with Chris and Izzy on Mutch, admiring their new Nauticat that they had just bought in Kos.

The girls arrived on one of the large Hellenic Seaways ferries; one of 28 daily ferries.  The wash created by the Fast Sea Cat Champion Jet ferries when they come in and spin round at high speed, sends a series of surge waves which curl and ricochet around the outer wall of the harbour and hit the boats on the pontoon in a domino effect, causing alarming rocking and rolling.  We were parked right by a very solid lamp post and our gang plank came up against it and was damaged.

On Saturday, we met up with Stephen and Gillian Hodgson who joined us from Mykonos.  Unfortunately, they arrived without their luggage which was somewhere in Manchester airport.

We had a very pleasant evening out with them on the roof top at Oniro restaurant up in the Hora. 

Next day, we set off to the south of Naxos to put the engine to the test.  Typically, the wind was blowing from the south so we had to motor all the way.  The bad news was, that Ian noticed that there was some diesel leaking out of the engine but couldn’t identify where it was coming from.   We motored the whole way (4 hours)  to Ormos Kalados at the bottom of Naxos and anchored off.  Stephen and Gilly hired a buggy and set of on an adventure down the island to meet us there.  They booked a room at Kalados studios.  It is a rural and remote spot with sheep regularly strutting up and down the beach and donkeys and horses grazing in the fields.  We had been told about a fabulous rustic restaurant above the harbour where you could get barbecued lamb chops and fabulous veggies.  We had a fantastic meal there, and, although the wine was rough and cloudy, it didn’t stop us drinking rather too much of it!

We ferried Stephen and Gilly back to their end of the long and deserted beach and crashed out. Unfortunately, even the copious quantities of wine we had consumed couldn’t help us sleep in the swell that crept in during the night on the southerly wind!  We were bobbing about badly all night.

Next morning, we decided that we ought to set off back to Naxos town to get the leak looked at.  We were pleased that the wind was still southerly.  It would be a nice sail back up.  As soon as we rounded the headland to take us into the Paros/Naxos Straits, we saw lots of other yachts ahead. They were heading south under head sails only.  Strange? How could they also be sailing on a southerly wind?  Ah!  Wait a moment the wind has changed….we have 14k on the nose, as per usual.  So, we motored and the engine seemed to be doing well despite the leak.

We were barely a mile from the marina entrance, just passing between an area of rocks jutting from the headland, literally the most dangerous spot in the entire area, when the engine spluttered and died!  OH! GREAT!

We quickly deployed the head sail and sailed away from the danger towards the top of Paros.  There was a shocked silence amongst the crew.   I guess we were all wondering how we would get back into the marina without an engine.

We sailed and contemplated the situation.  After about 30 minutes, when the engine had cooled a little, Ian and Keira went to peer in the engine room.  Ian managed to bleed the airlock out and miraculously the engine started again.  We all breathed a huge collective sigh of relief!  We motored back into the marina.  Stratos, the engineer, returned in the morning to further investigate.  We have discovered that the fourth fuel injector is slightly corroded.  It leaks very slightly and,  when the fuel is compressed within, a very fine mist of diesel is ejected, which makes seeing precisely where the leak is coming from particularly difficult.  (Although the leak doesn’t affect the performance of the engine when it is running, as soon as the engine is stopped the air can get in and engines do not like air bubbles inside them!)

Stratos sorted the injector and advised replacing it over the winter.  Phew!  Job done.  Beach day, well and truly deserved and drinks with Stephen and Gilly before heading home to cook up a huge curry.

Next day, we left the marina at about noon and had a lovely sail down to the south of Paros to Ormos Aliki.  (Which was precisely where Stephen and Gilly had just booked into a hotel for the night, unbeknownst to us!)  We were just motoring up to the delightful looking anchorage when the engine stuttered and slowly died – again!  Bloody hell!

We put the head sail back out and sailed about whilst deciding what was best to do.  Concluding that it would be best to get back to Naxos, we set off at 1515h tacking into the wind.  Luckily, the wind was quite strong so we made good progress.  We arrived in Naxos bay, rounding the Vrak Fournos rock and wreck in six hours.  The plan was to sail directly into the anchorage to the north of the marina.  We had actually managed to start the engine again but couldn’t rely on it giving power so we sailed in on a close haul with the boom out ready to drop the main.  Once we were behind the breakwater, we dropped the main and used the head sail only to power us further in.  Immediately we were in position, we let the headsail flap and put the anchor down as the wind pushed us back.  Just for the added challenge we had to do all this in the dark…luckily there was a full moon to light the way!

We were well set!  Mightily relieved, we put the boat to bed and had a welcome beer.  We soon rustled up some chilli and had an enjoyable dinner down below because it was surprisingly cold on deck.

In the morning, we motored into the marina with Josh motoring beside us in the dinghy as back up in case the engine failed again.  Nikos, the Harbourmaster, was joking with us that we should ask him for the annual rate for mooring.   Stratos returned once again and pumped out the fuel, filtered it, changed all the fuel pipes and cleaned the tank out.  There must have been debris in the tank that stopped the fuel from being delivered to the engine.

He has already found one solidified pellet of liquid gasket (a kind of blue tack used to seal things) and believes there might be more.  He has also found other bits of debris in the fuel tank and coating the sides of the fuel pipes.

This does seem to be progress.  Stratos assures us that the engine is fine; and now that he has cleaned the fuel there should be no further problems.  With each successful outing we gain more confidence that the engine will not let us down. On the plus side; we have learnt such a lot and had our sailing skills further tested.

It has been a bit of a baptism of fire for the girls and Josh and I have been more than a little anxious to have all my eggs in one basket!  At the same time, it has been lovely and comforting to have help on board and we are proud to see how well they have coped with all the excitement.