Tag Archives: blue water cruising

The Heane’s are here.

We booked an Air BnB place so that we didn’t subject David and Angela to the horrors of the boatyard ladder in the night. From here we were able to explore a little of the old town and have one or two delicious pitta gyros. 

On the morning of Friday 21st September, we completed all the last minute jobs on board.

 

Linea was put back in the water at 1230pm, having been seven weeks out of action.  After a quick check from Kamel that all was well with the sail drive and engine, we set sail for Symi.

Actually, we motored the whole way as the wind was on the nose and we wanted to test the engine.  We were able to use David’s vast fishing experience and trolled a line behind us.  David’s conviction that we were going to catch a fish was contagious.  We had a bite, a big one, but it got away.  A few minutes later the line went taut and we actually managed to reel in our first fish!  After consultation, we discovered that it was an Atlantic Bonita, a member of the tuna family, of which even adult ones are quite small – 12cm to 35cm apparently.  It was duly dispatched and filleted.  We anchored in Panormitis Bay just in time to watch the setting sun flit across the impressive monastery edifice and plunge the bay into shade.

Next stop, and a fantastic sail away, was Nisiros: The volcano island. No joy with fishing today. We had a wonderful couple of days there and then set sail for the south coast of Kos to sit out some strong northerlies and to drop off the Heanes

In the morning, we saw a large shoal of pipe fish making murmurations in the shade under our boat.  There were several large predators nearby and one came in for the kill, carrying off one of the thin fish broadside across his mouth.  We tried in vain to tempt him with our lure from the dinghy but he was not to be fooled.

The windy weather arrived and we decided a long lunch was called for.  We headed for shore and to the Sydney bar and had a fantastic meal two days running.

All too soon, it was time to say goodbye to David and Angela.  We waved them off as we sailed west for Astipaliea.

 

Back to the Boatyard

Nereus Boatyard Rhodes featuring Terence Conran’s speed boat.

Penny, Alison and Keira all headed off on the weekend of the 9th September.   We went back to the boat on the hard in dusty Rhodes.

It’s a strange feeling living on a boat balanced three metres up in the air.  Although you do get a bird’s eye view of all the comings and goings in the ferry terminal and can see all the cruise ships docking opposite.

Mr Ilias, Mr Chalkitis and me

Some boatyards don’t allow you to live aboard whilst your boat is on the hard but here it is no problem.  There are basic facilities in the yard (with hot water!); as long as you don’t mind shinning up and down a ladder to go to the loo in the night.

Mrs Chalkitis and me

We are about twenty minutes’ walk from the old part of Rhodes and shops are near at hand.  Mr and Mrs Chalkitis, the owners and Mr Ilias, the boatyard manager, are delightful and we have enjoyed meeting them.  We even have our own private beach so have been for a few dips in the sea as long as the boat yard hasn’t been antifouling any boats in the previous few days, as all the waste water drains off into the sea!

Before polishing

Whilst we waited for the spare parts we set about polishing the hull and top sides.  Not an easy job in the heat.  A thin layer of dust has settled on the boat and all this had to washed off before we could begin to shine her up.  We were proud of our efforts and then the yard pressure-washed a boats of its antifoul immediately up wind of us so everything was covered in a thin coating of blue! Grrr!

After and with polishing kit.

On Monday 17th September the brand new sail drive arrived fresh from the Volvo factory and it was carefully hoisted in to the boat and fitted by Mr Thomaz Kalligas.  (The Best mechanic in the Mediterranean – he reassuringly informed us.)

Mr Tomaz Kalligas and the new Volvo sail drive.

Ably assisted by Kamel, the new gear box was soon in place, however, the bracket needed to fit the sail drive to the engine was not there.  Also the flange that was supposed to be completely compatible with our engine turned out not to be so.  After a few adjustments, we had to use the old one instead.

The necessary bracket had to be ordered from Volvo and would be with us in a couple of days.  (Why nobody thought to tell us that this was an essential piece of kit for fitting the sail drive, we have still to get to the bottom of.)

The part was flown in on Wednesday and fitted.  We were finally ready to go back in the water but the weather had other ideas, as strong winds were forecast to be blowing right into the slips for the next couple of days.

The new, old original Volvo never used prop. The Max Prop has gone off to be serviced.

We have finally heard back from our insurance company.  Unfortunately, they are unable to uphold our claim for accidental damage saying that the sail drive was broken by corrosion.  Therefore, NONE of our expenses have been covered by the insurance policy  (except for the initial tow to safety) which is a bitter blow, and will definitely have an impact on our cruising future.

Ian proud of his newly polished top sides.

Time in Turkey

From Symi , Greece to Turkey is only 10 miles.  We had to go to Datca first to check in and complete all the formalities.

We spent a glorious two weeks sailing with Erin and Josh along the Datca peninsula east towards Marmaris.  The anchorages are wonderful, the waters crystal clear and the coastal areas wooded and attractive.  Turkish people have been kind and welcoming.

We feel that we must return to Turkey to properly see it in all its splendour.

Messing about with Ian’s swing mechanism.
In goes Erin.
The island in Keci Buku.
The sand bar at the head of the bay , covered with paddling people.
Eclipse of the moon.
Swanning about!
Bozburun.
Erin driving the boat.

 

Heading Further East

July 2018

With Keira back on board it was time to start heading east to pick up Erin and Josh from Kos.

Levitha mooring buoys.

Even the Meltemi wind had gone on holiday, so we had delightful and stress free sailing and stops in Schinousa, Amorgos, Levitha and finally Kos Marina.

An inexplicable large metal ‘pod’ near the only restaurant on Levitha

Kos Marina gave us a convenient spot close to the shower block and laundry. Were they trying to tell us something?

carved stones embedded in the wall of the fort in Kos.

The next day, with Erin and Josh too, we departed for a jaunt to Nisos Pserimos, just north of Kos, for an overnight anchorage prior to returning to sit out the next meltemi winds.   The anchorage was fantastic although there was a lot of debris on the beach including three knackered old RIBS.

View north over the fields of Kos to the coast.
Church and cemetery.

We had a great sail back to the old harbour in Kos Town.  The Town Quay is in use despite a shocking  6.7 Richter scale earthquake last year.  The quake has created quite a severe kinks and cracks in the concrete but the bollards are still in place.  We took a road trip in a hire car round the island and were pleasantly surprised at how leafy and green it was in places.

Birthday meal out.

We had a lovely few days in Kos town (Trash Tuesday turned into ‘Trash Every Day of the Week’ as we collected loads of plastic from within the harbour!)  We celebrated my birthday with a meal out and rigging up my new fishing rod!  All too soon it was time to say TTFN to Keira who was going back to the UK to work at Oxford Summer School.

Ian, Jacqueline, me and Peter.

We met up with Jacqueline and Peter from SY Dolce Farr Niente, M D R Friends, and it was great to compare notes with them despite the distractions of Wimbledon and World Cup finals on TV.

The lights surrounding Kos Old Harbour.

As soon as the wind calmed to a brisk 18kts we decided to leave Kos for an anchorage to the south of the island.  Kamares Bay is well-protected, experiences little swell and has facilities ashore, so was perfect for us.  We stayed for a couple of nights and then had a lovely downwind sail straight to Nisos Nisiros.

Gorgeous blue shutters on Nisiros.

What a pretty village and pleasant harbour.

Bell tower.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The view from the hill. Wow!!

We hired a car here to explore the caldera, villages and black sand beaches of this incredible volcano island.  The smell of sulphur wafting from the caldera was almost overpowering.

On the crust of the caldera and hoping it won’t crack, or erupt!

It was truly amazing.

Feta tin. Now that’s a lot of cheese!

 

 

Our first ‘catch’ with the new rod and reel.
The gap between Symi and the island to the north. Only 3m deep in parts.
The anchor chain straight ahead of us through the crystal clear waters of Ay Marina, Symi.
I want one of these!! But would it get up Grassington hill

Our next sail was a thirty-five miler east to Symi.  This island is tucked in under the Datca peninsula.  We anchored in Ay Marina just north of Pethi and enjoyed the crystal clear waters.  The wind was a fruity 28kts gusting in here but we were safe. Two nights here, and then we headed to Symi town to check out of Greece.

Symi town.

Symi Town is soooo lovely.  The buildings encircle the bay and creep up the steep slopes around.  They are all designed as if by a child, each with symmetrical windows, central door, red tiled rooves, colourful doors and window shutters.  The clock tower was just like the miniature wooden ones that come in a toy farm set.  Heikell describes it as ‘an exotic flower in a desert’, but it’s too cute for that. Certainly, it is a surprising and endearing place.  (More of that in a later blog!)

The Datca peninsula and S.ymi with Kos to the north

Next Stop Turkey.

Our 40th Island in Greece and 39 years since I was first here!

The cathedrals and churches of the Chora above and the pretty coloured houses of Klima on the shore of Nisos Milos.

We left Milos after an informative morning at the Mining Museum and headed to an anchorage about 15 miles east.  We anchored over incredible sand and enjoyed some snorkelling.  We saw a wide variety of fish and even an octopus.

The jagged pyroclasticfloe rocks of Nios Poliagos.

Next day, we headed to Ios in the southern Cyclades and arrived bang on our ETA.

We anchored in Milapotas Bay over white sand and clear waters.  We discovered that Keira and her group of hen party friends were staying very close to the bay so we met up for a beer in the evening.

It was so great to see them all.

The view through the arched door of Port Ios

The following day Ian and I took a bus to Ios port and I tried in vain to orientate myself with my 39 years old memories.  It all seemed to have changed quite a bit.  There are certainly lots more buildings in the bay to the north and the dirt road as was, is now a proper road.

Church of Port Ios headland.
One of about 7 seven old windmills at the top of the CHora

We walked up to the Chora (litter picking the plastic debris on route as it is Trash Tuesday again) and had a wander round.  It wasn’t quite as charming as I remembered although there were some pretty bougainvillea shrouded squares, bonny churches and old windmills.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Me and Steph in Crete 2011

Of course, we had a pitta gyros and toasted my best friend, Stephanie Minto, with whom I shared a good few gyros during that summer of ’79.

 

 

Meanwhile, there was lots of communication back and forth between us and Erin as her plans for her plans for Grandma’s 80th birthday trip to Wimbledon came to a head.  Her source for tickets didn’t work out; then Grandma missed her train.

But it all worked out alright in the end and they are about to crack a bottle of wine on Henman Hill !

It was a massive amount of organisation for Erin to do whilst working many hours at the restaurant too.  She sorted travel, accommodation, transport to Wimbledon, parking, tickets, picnic and even strawberries and cream.

What a fantastic memory making day!

Sun shining through the pretty church tower.