Tag Archives: Bavaria 430 Lagoon

Engine Problems.

Changing the fuel filters and priming the engine!

 

After the core plug incident, which was fixed up in Thassos, the next blip in the engine department came as we left Paros after a lovely few days with my brother and his family.  We had a fantastic sail back across to Naxos.  Just as we were entering the bay at Agia Annas we put the engine on in preparation to drop the mainsail and anchor in our preferred spot.  As I was going forward to sort out the anchor Ian announced that we had no power.  The engine was on but would not deliver any revs.

We put the anchor down in 12m of water and were holding well.  The forecast for the next few days was for stronger and stronger winds up to 40knts some days.  We put more chain out and tried to fix the problem until the small hours of the morning.

Ian changed the fuel filters and consulted our Cruising Association friends online.  Having primed the engine and tried to eradicate the air inside he was still having no luck getting it going. I had to go ashore the next day to drop my friend Jane so that she could return to France.  I also needed to buy some Calor gas.  I returned to the quay and intending to give the engineers a lift to the boat but the wind was too strong for it to be safe for me to return across the bay and the engineers didn’t fancy it either.

Ian, meanwhile was sitting on the boat on his own and listening to the wind whistle in the rigging and the sea slap the sides of the boat. He was staring at the rocks behind, all the time growing more and more anxious about what might happen if the anchor slipped in the ever increasing winds.  He decided that the best thing was to call the coastguard rather than suffer another 48 hours of strong winds at anchor.

This he duly did and within minutes the coast guard had despatched a small ferry (Kerras Cruises) to come to our rescue.  They brought him in at 6kts strapped to the side of their boat, having patiently assisted Ian to lift 100m of anchor chain.  They deposited Linea on the rough concrete jetty at Agia Annas and we were all mightily relieved.  It took us a further six hours to sort out fenders, lines, springs, fender boards and anchors ‘til we were happy that we were secure and safe on this, the windward side of the quay.

We slept very well that night despite the squeaking up and down against the tyre on the quay.

Next day, the engineers came and were gasping at how much we were being charged by the ferry company for the rescue.  (As were we; but we just glad that we and Linea were safe! – Euros 1500 – ouch!) They had a look at the engine and got it going quite quickly, saying it was air trapped in the engine, ‘like in jail!’

We had to be signed off by a port police surveyor, who arrived in the  afternoon two days later, before Ian could claim his papers back.  We were up early on Saturday 19th August in the calm of dawn and cast off from the quay without incident, even though we had the tricky manoeuvres of removing two anchors at 90 degrees to the boat.  We drove across the bay to anchor again and tidy up.  After a quick engine check we smelt diesel again and rang the engineers to ask them to come back to look once more.

They rapidly arrived and came out in the tender.  After a quick look they tightened a few nuts and headed off again.  We motored all the way to Naxos Town with no problems.

 

That afternoon, Alice and Ian arrived.  We had a lovely evening wandering the alleyways of old town Naxos and ate at Onino restaurant, which was very nice.

Next morning, we prepared for a trip across to Siros in favourable winds.  After an hours’ motoring, the engine conked out and so we turned around and sailed back to Naxos Town.

The engineers made their third visit but couldn’t diagnose any problems because, perversely, the engine started and was running ok!

So, what to do, now????

We all felt that a day on the island was a good distraction from these disturbing engine issues.

The view from the top.

We hired a car and set off for an adventure across Naxos.  We stopped in the mountain village of Koronos and had a late lunch of home-cooked traditional fare at Dalas Taverna, which was delicious.

 

 

Vine covered terrace at Dalas Taverna.

 

The cracked sump and everyone peering in the engine. including interesting Michael!

 

 

 

 

 

 

On arriving back at the car, we saw a stream of oil pouring across the road coming from the sump.  We called the car hire company and the owner arrived in another car after an hour.

We had travelled just about half way back when the second car gave up the ghost.  The fuel pump had gone!

The hire car owner came to fetch us and we all squashed into the car with the damaged sump and drove back to Naxos.  (Cost – Euros 180 since damage to the underside of the car is not covered by insurance – obviously!)

This morning, back on Linea, we were just about to set off again when Ian did his routine engine checks to find coolant all over the engine and in the bilges.

NOT GOOD!  The two Ian’s sussed the problem and then walked all over Naxos town trying to find a radiator cap.

All these problems in quick succession have led to a loss in faith and confidence in the engine.  Even sailing boats need reliable engines. My strong feeling was that we needed to find someone who could look at all parts of the engine and do a proper service – investigating, thoroughly, the cause of the engine stalling.

We rang the surveyor and he recommended Stratos Karoulis.    For Stratos to come to us we needed to be in the marina so I made nineteen calls to the harbour master and finally we decided to just motor in.  Sails at the ready, we drove into the marina.  We were allocated a place and within half an hour Stratos had arrived and was stripping down the engine.

He removed the high pressure fuel pump and sent it off to Athens to be diagnosed.

So, here we are, in Naxos marina in a meltemi wind.

Today, Alice and Ian left us, having sailed all of 9 miles!  We have been so glad of their support during the last few days.

With all these engine issues in both car and boat we just hope we are not jinxed!!

Post script;  A week later, Stratos returned with the reconditioned Fuel Pump and replaced it.  He checked all the other pipes and tubes and declared that as far as he could see all was well.  We need to check the engine under load and for that we will have to motor out for at least an hour to just wait and see how it performs.  So we will head south to an anchorage still on Naxos in case we need the services of Stratos again!

Naxos and Paros with friends and faaaamily!

As soon as we arrived we deployed the dinghy and Ian went to the jetty at Agia Annas to collect the Hill-Cable gang.  They all came back to the boat and Sam and Louis were soon jumping in and defying each other to do more and more intrepid leaps off the boat.  Sam, who had stayed with us in June, was in charge of showing everyone around and explaining the use of the heads!!

We enjoyed a few chilled beers with everyone and I loved showing Sarah and Paddy around Linea.

They headed off to freshen up and and we all met up later for dinner.  Deciding to wander up towards Prokopios we came across an open air cinema showing Zorba the Greek.   It was an interesting film with a young Alan Bates in the lead role and Anthony Quinn as Zorba. It was fascinating to see Crete of old and to learn of the harsh amoral ways of the society then.

The following day Louis was poorly and so Paddy and Sam came out to the boat to chill for the afternoon as the wind was picking up and we didn’t really want to leave her.

My pal Jane, who I used to work with at Malsis, arrived to stay for a few days.   She was thrown right in at the deep end with a trip to the cinema to see Mamma Mia with Bryn and Jill. We all had a good sing!

Next day, Paddy and gang were heading off to Paros.  Jane and I took a bus trip to Naxos town and had a lovely afternoon wandering around the Chora… me reminiscing about the time I spent a night sleeping in the park there with my friend Stephanie Minto in 1979!  (Don’t tell Ivan and Carol!)

 

We were just heading out of the bus station when i heard a familiar voice.  I turned to look and recognised Nikos, whom we had worked for at Powder White during our ski season.  It was quite an extraordinary coincidence as a couple of seconds either way and I would not have seen him. 

On the Sunday, we set sail for the north part of Paros to a wonderful anchorage with safety from winds from any direction.  We anchored in the NE side of the bay and it was stunning despite the power station far off on the south coast of the bay.  Unfortunately, it was a long and exposed dinghy ride to and fro the beach where Paddy and gang were.

Nevertheless, we did manage for them to come to the boat for a day, and for Louis to stay over and watch the meteor shower with us.  We had a good walk along the shore, some snorkelling, a bit of beach time and an exploration of the marina and town of Naoussa.

The town is a lovely jumble of alleyways and squares.  The marina is an interesting place with lots of anchor knitting and big motor yachts taking up a lot of the space.   We decided that we would have to stay at anchor.

We spent lovely, all too few days with the family.  Paddy and gang were due to depart on the Wednesday from Mykonos so we dragged ourselves away just after the sun had gone down and the wind picked up and set off across the bay to the boat, waving a fond farewell as we went.

We were happy to get back to boat after a thorough drenching in the dinghy in huge waves and in the dark!

Spotting a weather window we decided to sail back to Naxos on the Tuesday so that Jane could get back to Athens.  We had a fantastic, heeled over sail back from Paros to Naxos.   We sailed into the anchorage at 8.5kt.  The wind was over 35kts in the bay.  We put away the head sail and switched on the engine.  Just as we were just about to head up to the wind to get the main sail down the engine would not give any power.

Oh shit!  We were quite well into the bay and in reasonably shallow water so we put the anchor down and let out a lot of chain.  Ian went down to inspect the engine.  We were holding nicely. We let out even more chain, cause its better out than in!, and tried to fix the engine and get it started again. 

We took Jane ashore the following morning in relatively calm winds of 22kt. We had sailed only about 50 miles all week and spent most of the time with a load of random people she’d never met.  She handled all this brilliantly, as I knew she would, and we really enjoyed our week with her.   We hope you’ll come again, Jane.

Surfing South (or, ‘I would Sail 5000 miles!’)

The Meltemi is coming

We timed our departure from the Northern Aegean to coincide with the Meltemi; a strong southerly wind that rushes from high pressure in the Balkans to low pressure over Crete.   The wind gathers pace and fury as it heads south and pummels most islands on its way past.  The wind isn’t a constant threat, it comes and goes, so in between there is virtually no wind.  It’s a frustrating because it limits your choices of sailing direction and possible sailing days.  On the plus side, it does mean that temperatures are a very pleasing 27 degrees, which is just about perfect.

So, with the Meltemi due we knew we would be whisked south at a great rate of knots in order to meet up with my brother Paddy, and his family, before the end of their holiday.  We were looking forward to some long days of sailing down wind and surfing along on the waves.

We left Thassos with an accompanying juvenile dolphin twisting and turning near the bow and made it to Myrini  on Limnos in good time.  Initially, we anchored in the bay but couldn’t find a spot we were happy with in strong winds and so spying a small space on the quay, we reversed in on the end.

The next day,  we awoke to a layer of fine sand over everything in the boat.  The wind had picked up and swept with it tonnes of black sand motes.  A boat sticky with salty air provided a large surface that these particles love to cling to, so very soon the boat, ropes, sprayhood and new bimini had a tinge of charcoal hue about them.  Hey ho!  No point in cleaning anything until the wind dies down in about four days.  Whilst gusts tossed chairs and tables about on the quay, we decided to hire a car and have a little exploration of the island.  It is a dry and dusty place in summer. Myrini was the prettiest place we saw with its imposing castle high above the town and the beautiful neo-classical buildings with their Juliette balconies, tall shuttered windows and tiled roofs.

We enjoyed wandering the vine covered alleyways of the town and sampling the delights of the restaurants away from the sea front.  We felt in with the locals when we played backgammon in a very popular ‘ouseria’.  Six euros for two ouzos, two carafes of cold water, a bucket of ice and a plate of meze snacks.

We spent a very moving afternoon visiting one of the Commonwealth War Graves Cemeteries on the island.  The island was the launch place for the ill-fated Gallipolli campaign in 1914 and thousands of lives were lost.  Here we met yet more friendly Australians, originally from Limnos, who come back every year to visit family.

After pre-dinner drinks on board Linea with fellow Cruising Association members Nigel and Lawrence on Cormorant we set sail early the next morning to Lesvos where we were due to meet Bryn and Jill.

After a five hour bus journey from Levkas to Athens, a flight from Athens to Lesvos and a two hour bus ride across the island to our western anchorage they were well in need of a beer or too as we caught up on our respective summer adventures.

Next morning, we set off to Khios.  We arrived in the late afternoon after a great downwind sail and parked stern to the new quay.  Yanis was there to meet us and we were delighted to see that there were showers and loos on the quay.  In the morning, we took a walk up to the village of Volissos where we found an old saddlemaker and joinery shop. The joiner was at home and switched his garden fountain on in our honour!  We had a peek into his workshop all twisted olive wood and wooden saddles for donkeys. The supermarket was small but superbly stocked and I was pleased to be able to buy some eco-friendly washing up liquid for the first time in Greece.

The owners agreed to give us a lift back to the port with all our shopping in an hours’ time so we continued our walk up into the village and found a lovely taverna for a late breakfast and a traditional wood fired bakery complete with sooty walls and doddery baker.

Once back at the boat we motored off to an anchorage at the south part of Khios and spent a calm night there in a deserted bay.

The wind had got up again the next day and we had a fair sail towards Ikaria.  Famous as the place where Ikarus flew off towards the sun.  Our pilot guide says that he believes Ikarus’ feathers were blown off not melted off, as the wind around Ikaria is renowned for its ferocity.  However, on the day we were there, there was no wind.

On arriving at Evdhilos port, we were informed by our lovely Greek neighbours that there was a traditional festival on in many of the mountain villages where there would be food and dancing to enjoy.  So we quickly organised a taxi and headed up to one of the villages at about 2200h.  The square was packed with people, tables and chairs.  The boys queued for food and Jill and I bagsied a table.  The food came wrapped in paper.  A huge amount of roasted goat, chips, Greek salad, tzatziki and bread, all to be washed down with locally produced red wine. Yum!

Soon the music livened up and people started to gather in the centre of the piazza to dance.  They linked hands and began to circle round demonstrating nimble foot work.  Irresistible!  We jumped up to join in.  Some of the dances went on for about 20 minutes.  We struck up a conversation with a lady on our table who told me she was 76 years old.  She was extremely fit and agile.  She lived in California, was married to a Brit and wanted to return to live in her native Ikaria.  She was on her annual sojourn to the island. I asked her about the secrets of the islanders longevity which we had heard so much about.  She said it was too complex a thing to explain in a five minute conversation.  She mentioned that it was to do with so many factors such as diet, exercise, mental well-being, family and social connections and so on.  Makes sense.

The following day we arose a little later than normal and hired a car to go off exploring.  We drove along the hairpin bends that skewer the rocky island slopes and wound our way towards the south coast and Kirikos.  After a quick stop at a pebbly beach and a dip, we headed back to watch the sun set.

Next day, the wind was perfect for the final leg of the journey south.  We surfed down huge waves and in big winds to arrive in Agia Annas on Naxos to a welcoming committee from Paddy, Sarah, Sam and Louis waving frantically from the quay.  How marvellous.

The evening was topped off with a visit to the open air cinema to see Zorba the Greek!

Next day, we chilled on the boat in the strengthening winds and then met up with my friend Jane Blanshard (an ex-colleague from Malsis) back at the open air cinema for a viewing of Mamma Mia!

We waved a fond farewell to Bryn and Jill and look forward to seeing them soon.   We were so pleased to have them, with their sailing experience, on board for the 300 miles surfing south and we celebrated reaching another milestone – our 5000th mile on Linea.

Trevor the Turtle

We don’t see a lot of sea life in the Aegean so it was a treat to see this fella swim past the boat.

Guest blog – exams over

After a stressful period of exams, I was relieved and excited to have the opportunity to finally fulfil my dream of sailing in the Med. It was very daunting flying “solo” to a place I had never been before and staying with people whom I had never met. However, I was quickly put at ease by Sarah and Ian.

We drove to the Marina where the spectacular Linea was waiting and I was delighted to find out that we had good company present in the form of “gin palace” rental man Lorenzo. We conversed with him for a short while before heading off to the beach to top up the tan. However, we found out that this was one of the few bays in the fingers which was harbouring hundreds of sea urchins. We put this thought to the back of our minds and ventured out into deeper water. While snorkelling there we enjoyed chasing the fish which were inhabiting the coral. Normally snorkelling is not my biggest hobby due to the waters of sunny Cornwall not being particularly warm, however swimming in water hot enough to bath in was wonderful. Upon return to the yacht I was pleasantly surprised to find an iced coffee waiting for me, made by Lorenzo. We finished the day with a very pleasant evening at the beach taverna accompanied by great food and local entertainment.

The next day we said farewell to our neighbours and set off to the next finger. Sam and I both took turns helming which was great fun. During our journey we practiced our man overboard principles, experimenting with buoys and a lost “frozen ball”. Nobody was harmed during this exercise and both the buoy and the frozen ball were recovered safely. Upon arrival to our destination we anchored up and packed all the sails away. Sam and I then began to wind down and we engaged in activities such as diving off the boat. We spent the rest of the night together eating on board and after packing everything away we brought out the cards and had a great game of Uno.

Chefs at work

Over the next couple of days we did some bay hopping and Sam and I both took the opportunity to go to shore to walk to the various towns around our position to collect some supplies and take some photos. We continued to do some diving off the front of the boat and we also erected a rope swing which was thoroughly enjoyable. During the nights which we stayed in the bays Sam and I were tasked with cooking some carbonara. It was not too bad, however, Sam and I seemed to use too little pasta and cream meaning portions were a bit thin! Cooking on a boat, rocking from side to side, was quite a challenging experience but it was nonetheless enjoyable. On the next night we watched a talent show unfold from our boat. The “talent” was not actually visible to us (as we were watching from afar), however the music was certainly audible, so much so that we were all very tempted to go ashore and cut the audio cables. The music went on into the early hours of the morning.

Meet Genevieve

The next morning we prepared the boat in order for a short sail across to the second finger. We got the spinnaker out and we caught some nice wind, maxing out at roughly 6 Knots. The sail did have to come down before we arrived, as we had reached a fairly treacherous point of our journey- the entrance to Diaporos. We were therefore forced to motor in and we found a lovely sheltered spot in which we were accompanied by fellow Brits, an Aussie, a Frenchman and a Hungarian. At the Diaporos we continued diving and swimming from the boat, but we also took up games such as backgammon and draughts. We did this mainly, however on several occasions we ventured off into some of the inlets for some snorkelling and a general look around the stunning collective of bays. During these days we also played a lot of beach tennis, however we never did finish our mini “Wimbledon/Diaporos” tennis tournament. We finished off our stay in the Diaporos Island with a visit to the local restaurant based at one of the campsites dotted around the coast of the mainland. Our hosts were very welcoming however throughout the night there was an ongoing issue in the communication department, which meant that my main meal never arrived. This aside we all had a great night out and Sam and I were lucky enough to meet some of the locals, with whom we snatched up the opportunity of a photo.

The boys meet the “girls”

The next day we set off to our final destination of the trip and while under sail we conducted some more man overboard drills. We arrived at a pontoon and tied ourselves up. Sam and I then jetted off on the tender to Ormos Panagias to have a walk to the long strip of beach in the bay adjacent to the one in which we were staying. Unfortunately for us, during the trip back from the beach to Linea the engine very abruptly cut out on us- as we had run out of fuel- meaning we had to row back.

No fuel

In doing this I worked up quite an appetite which was met with splendid seafood from one of the restaurants in Ormos Panagias.

This was a wonderful way to finish off our fantastic 11 day stay on Linea.

Thank you so much for allowing me aboard you home and for making me feel welcome.

Rory Cornelius Smith