Tag Archives: Bavaria 430 Lagoon

Summary of sailing on Linea 2016

Linea’s travels this year.

linea-route-2016Miles covered – 3435 nautical miles

Miles sailed -2373

Miles motored – 1062

Engine hours – 354

Number of countries – seven: Portugal, Gibraltar, Morocco, Spain, Italy, Greece, Albania

Number of land masses – Fourteen: Europe, Africa, Ibiza, Mallorca, Minorca, Cabrera, Sardinia, Egadi Islands Favignana, Sicily, Kephalonia, Zakinthos, Paxos, Corfu, Mathraki,

Visitors – 35

Total nights on board – 256

Number of paid nights in Marina or Town Quay – 93

Number of ports of call – 73

Number of anchorages – 92

Number of mooring buoys – 2

Number of town quays – 17

Nights at sea – 8

Longest consecutive stretch of free berths and/or anchorage – 29 nights

Deepest water sailed over – 2950m

Bottles of wine consumed! – that would be telling

Number of rescues – 2

Number of fenders found – 1

Number of dinghies found – 1

Number of dolphins seen – pods and pods

Number of things broken/damaged – too many to list!

Amount learnt – incalculable!

Number of bruises – too bloody many

Number of mozzie bites – quite a few – but not as many as I had thought

Number of arguments – just the odd one!

Books read – a goodly few.  Best ones North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell!  Behind closed doors by B A Paris

Scrabble played – Scrabbled out!   (well almost!)Sant Miguel anchorage

Winter plans for Linea and her crew 2016/2017

 

We have been busy since arriving here in Marina di Ragusa, Sicily; not just with jobs to get the boat repaired and shipshape after all the miles this summer but with our plans for what we wanted to do in the winter.

We reviewed the finances and concluded that in order to continue cruising we would have to earn over the winter, or at least stop spending.  Rather than returning to our previous roles, we investigated some interesting alternatives.  House-sitting,pet sitting, contract housekeeping for someone with two homes, jobs back home in the Shire, jobs abroad.

In the end, we decided that we could combine our love of ski-ing and the mountains, our enjoyment of food and cooking by applying for a few roles with chalet/ski companies which operate in the Tignes/Val d’Isere area.  Since Erin is going to be working in Tignes this winter, we thought we could work in the vicinity and thus be able to see more of her than we have during the last two years that she has been working in Thailand.

We are delighted to have been offered positions as chalet hosts with renowned company, Powder White, in Val d’Isere  We will be running a chalet for them!

Very exciting and just a little bit daunting.

Hopefully, there will still be time to fit in some ski-ing.  We look forward to catching up with any friends and family that come to Val!

Sailing back to Sicily and our winter berth at Marina Di Ragusa

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Crotone to Marina di Ragusa in Sicilia

The huge castle in Crotone

We spent a couple of days in Crotone and enjoyed having a wander round this town with its huge castle and imposing town walls.

We enjoyed briefly meeting fellow sailors on Three Times a Lady (try spelling that with the phonetic alphabet!) and early the next morning we slipped out in the calm morning breeze and wove our way out between the gas rigs and set off south and a reasonable lick.  The wind was as fluky as predicted across the Golfo di Squillace and so we slowed right down.  The night passed much better than the trip from Corfu and apart from one incident when two sailing boats appeared out of the darkness rather closer than I would have liked, the crossing went smoothly.

We then hit strong winds on our approach to Syracuse but coming right at us on the nose so we had to tack considerably further than we wanted to. img_3525

However, we arrived safely after two days and one night at sea and motored towards the incredible bay of Syracuse.  We followed the procedure for gaining permission to enter and were allocated a berth, along with one other yacht on the massive town quay.  Soon after we were tied up we visited the coast guard to do the necessary paperwork and were pleased with ourselves for doing things right.  Next morning the Coast guard came round to check our papers.  We were rewarded with a warm handshake and welcome to Syracuse.

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Syracuse duomo

We spent the whole day walking round this incredible city. syracuse

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We visited the Leonardo Da Vinci museum

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Leonardo Da Vinci models of his inventions

which has large working wooden models of his inventions and was absolutely fascinating. l-da-v-pulleys-to-aid-construction

 

 

 

The market was fabulous as Italian markets always are. Seeing all the fish and fresh produce made us hungry, even o soon after breakfast, so we had an amazing Sicilian lunch in a little back street café.

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Pasta Siciliana and Seafood risotto

I had Pasta Siciliana which is made with a sauce of anchovies, pinenuts, sun dried tomatoes, oil, garlic, and sprinkled with herby breadcrumbs. Mmmm.  Ian had Seafood risotto with saffron.

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Syracuse Promenade
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Ancient Roman ruins in Syracuse

We need to go back to Syracuse because it was just beautiful and there we were, just parked on the promenade in the most enviable spot.

After a couple of nights there we just had a short hop round to Marina di Ragusa to complete.  A longish day but do-able.  We calculated 56 miles.  We ended up doing 81 miles as the wind was, once again blowing right at us! We made it in, in the dark, and tied to the fuel pontoon ‘til morning.  The security guards, alerted by the barking  guard dog, flew round in a car and quizzed us. Once we had told them that we were booked in for the winter they gave us vigorous handshakes and lots of  ‘va bene’s and shot back to their security posts.

Next day, we oh so smoothly, parked the boat in our winter berth – L16. Within minutes we had been invited aboard the opposite boat for coffee and met up with Carl, Amanda, Mark, Peter and Catherine.  This is the most sociable place with 162 boats and around 300 live-aboards staying for the winter.  We soon heard about a daily radio net, Yoga, knitting and tai chi classes, Italian lessons, olive picking experience, dinner out en masse, happy hours (3 of them per week), music making group, Halloween party, and much more…

What a fantastic, welcoming and friendly international community.

 

From Albania to Italy

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Forgot to mention the rain in Kassiopi. So much that the life jackets deployed in the locker of the dinghy and had to be forcibly removed.
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Wet weather gear. Wet inside and out!

We left Saranda after saying goodbye to our agents Jelja and Gazman and headed straight to Kassiopi.  We exchanged our gas bottle and as soon as we were ready set off from the bay and sailed westwards.

I was lazing about reading the pilot guide when Ian mentioned something about a big black cloud ahead.

I scurried off to get my wet weather jacket.  I had already had to remove my wet weather trousers because I was too hot.  So I was looking rather fetching in my wellies, shorts and waterproof.

Ian suggested putting a further reef into the sail to make it smaller.  I was busy with my zip!  He realised we had no time to put the reef in because by the time you’ve thought of it, it is, of course, already too late!  I had time to release the main sail just when the storm hit us.  The rain came lashing down, Ian had reached the wheel and resumed the helming from the auto pilot.  We turned in a huge circle and ran away down wind.  The wind was gusting up to 46 knots and the boat made a top speed of 13.5 knots.  (I am glad I didn’t know about that until we made landfall in Italy some 24 hours later!) wind-gust Ian was being lashed by horizontal rain as the lightning came down and the wind howled.  He was like King Lear raging against the elements!

As quickly as it arrived the storm left us and thunder continued to rumble overhead for another hour gradually retreating.  Ian put his jacket on over his soaking wet shirt – in an attempt to keep warm.  How am I going to get that dry?

The rest of the day and night went uneventfully as we batted at an average speed of 6 knots towards Crotone, Calabria.  The sea was rather lumpy and so we rolled up and over waves the whole time which made us feel pretty awful.  It seemed like an incredibly long crossing but, in fact, it was quite quick.  We arrived at 0430hrs just off the coast and rather than trying to enter the port in the dark we decided to hove-to and sat bobbing about like that for three hours whilst we had a nap.

Soon we were heading into the Yacht Kroton Club in Puorto Vecchio, Crotone and were looking forward to a pizza, a sleep and some wine later in celebration of Ian’s 56th Birthday!

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