Tag Archives: 430 lagoon

Go Fish!

enter site IMG_3248[1]On the first evening in Cala Portals Vells I announced to Ian that I was going to do some fishing!  He smiled ruefully, remembering his frustrating childhood experiences of fruitless fishing trips, perhaps?

Well, I prepared my line, which is four little hooks and a wine bottle cork, for a float, a very rudimentary affair.  I happened to have made some popcorn the night before and thought that it might make good bait, especially since it floats quite well. Looking down I could see shoals of sea bream all around the boat.  I tested their hunger levels by lobbing in a few morsels of popcorn.  They were immediately snapped up.

No messing, this was the time to get my line in.  Ian walked away to do some kind of job.  I threw out my line with another handful of popcorn and immediately I felt a tug. Disbelieving my own luck I looked down to see a silvery wriggle below the boat.  I shrieked over to Ian who thought I was having him on as he had barely had time to walk the full length of the boat.  He rushed back in time to see me pull up my line with not one, but two sea bream on it!

We dispatched the fish, removed the hooks and dipped the line again.They were only small….we needed more.  This time I just caught one more unsuspecting fish.

 

Subsequent attempts revealed that the fish can learn.  They would not come near my popcorn bait until it had drifted far off leaving my constellation of popcorn hooks looking so obviously fake.

They did not bite.

So we made do with three.  I gutted them and de-scaled them and we had three little fishes on a little dishy, for us tea!IMG_3026[1]

Next day, buoyed by my success I had another go and caught one more fish.   Just enough for a small lunch. But after that the fish had wised-up.  No more were tempted by my popcorn, bread or tortilla wraps.

We finally managed to drag ourselves away from the turquoise waters and the comings and goings in Cala Portals Vells and, on the morning of our departure, a huge motor cruiser pulled into the bay and dropped anchor.

Staff were busy polishing the stainless steel, laying out fluffy towels on the sun beds and  frothing the bubbles in the top deck  jacuzzi.  Speculation mounted on our boat that this could be Bruce Springsteen since he played in Madrid the night before!  Apparently,  he had a similar kind of holiday in Mallorca three years ago between gigs.  So, we hung around a bit more and sticky beaked through our fabulous binoculars but just saw lots of white uniformed crew members.  A quick look on the internet revealed that the cost of chartering this cruiser for a week, low season, was $470,000 plus expenses which would add a further $70,000 on top!  Mere bagatelle!  We sat in the same cove, with the same sun rise for a lot less than that!

We set off towards Andratx (and thence to Palma)  and our surprise assignation with Ian’s parents who had rung the night before to tell us they had booked a last minute cruise to the Mediterranean.

We anchored in the bay and I went ashore in the dinghy to restock supplies as we were virtually out of wine, and less crucial supplies, like fresh fruit and vegetables!

It was sad to see the poor Frenchman’s boat moored up and collecting a light dusting of Saharan sand and salt.

The next day we retraced our route and dodged the race regatta boats that were skimming along around us, and then headed round to Paguera but on looking at the small Cala we decided it wouldn’t offer enough protection against the forecasted strong northerly and northeasterly winds so we continued round towards Santa Ponca which is a wide bay surrounded by tall, sheltering buildings.

We set both anchors just in case and had a very good night with no buffeting at all.  Ian had even figured out how to stop the wind turbine so I wouldn’t feel the vibrations from it rotating all night!

We spent three lovely days here.  Although the beach front and town are not so attractive as other places we’ve seen, we were able to replenish food stocks again and suss out a great anchorage.  All jet skiing is regulated here and must be done from a floating pontoon way out in the bay, so it is a really quiet place to be, even though it’s so huge.  Whilst sneaking in to the marina to do our laundry we were pleased to meet up with fellow Soller pontooners on Moondance of Cork.   We had a lovely catch up chat, and their dulcet tones reminded us once again of Fascinating Aida’s rendition of Cheap Flights!  If you’ve not heard it, please do Google it!

On the 25th we sailed round to Palma de Mallorca, to one of the many marinas there and predictably arrived in time to park up in the strongest wind we had had for days!

We were down to our last drops of water which we had eeked out.  So whilst Ian sorted out the recycling and the gas cylinder, I refilled the tanks.  We then set too scrubbing the decks, windows and covers so that the boat would look her best for Henry and June’s visit.

Meanwhile, we spent some time marvelling at the super yachts parked up around us.  Across the way, in the boat yard, an enormous yacht waIMG_3327[1]s having it’s mast stepped.  There are 850 berths in this marina, there are eight marinas in total here – that’s a lot of boats and a great deal of wealth is evident.IMG_3324[1]  This must be one of the nicest back drops for a marina though.  Here we are tucked under the Cathedral and beside the Museum of Contemporary Art and four incredible old windmill towers and sails.

Such a beautiful city.

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Mum and Dad visit us on Linea
We were up and at ’em early; my first proper shower in five days!  Bliss.  Then we walked all the way along the fantastic promenade, people watching the whole time, to meet up with Henry and June outside the Cruise Ship terminal building.  It was soooo lovely to see them and we all had little weep.  So bizarre to be unexpectedly together in this lovely city, chatting as we wandered back in the warm sunshine.  We gave H and J the full guided tour (which takes about two minutes, by virtue of the fact that everything is very compact) In fact, it probably took longer for us to shoehorn them both down the hatch and into the main saloon!  ‘From the sublime to the ridiculous’ springs to mind when I think about the difference in size of their ship (20 floors high) and our dinky little boat.

We wandered through the old part of town to eat in a lovely tapas bar called 13 Prozent which had been recommended by a friend of a friend who lives in Palma.  Delicious and reasonably priced lunch and then back to our respective ships.

By the time H and J had walked back to the Ventura, we had left our mooring and were motoring across the bay within the breakwaters.  We did a sail-by and happened to spot them as they were boarding the ship.  We were all waving like crazy things.  It was a very special moment!

We then made our way out to the bay to hang about whilst the ship departed.  We sailed along with her until she sped away at 16 knots towards Italy. We waved again but couldn’t make out anybody on the port side promenade deck as it was in the shade.

We continued to sail across the bay to our anchorage at El Arenels.  The evening sun warm on our backs.  As soon as the anchor was down we dived in to cool off and check it was well bedded in.

We watched the sun go down over then distance hill and gazed up at the stars.  It is simply heavenly tonight.  Very little wind, safely anchored, only one other yacht, and a view of the lights around the whole of Palma Bay!

We left the bay of Palma and sailed off out round the Cabo Blanc with the dark clouds brooding overhead.   It was akin to driving the wrong way down a one way street.  IMG_3065[1]We passed so many charter boats that were returning to Palma after their week away.

 

Keen to try out my tuna hooks I carefully removed my new line from my fishing tackle box and tied on my hook and lure.  Within minutes I had created the most confounded and inexplicable messIMG_3062[1] and tangle of line from what was a perfectly looped coil!  Confident that I could untangle it I had a go, but no, it became even more mangled and knotted.

I gave up, threw it away and reverted to using my mackerel line.

We trawled that hook and lure most of the day.  Not a bloody thing!!!

Since arriving in Mallorca

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Velella Velella
we have not seen any dolphins or tuna.  We have seen sea bream, jelly fish and Velella Velella, (the jelly fish with the sail on their backs!)

 

 

Tomorrow, we set off to Porto Pollenca to meet up with the Chown family.

 

Fun and Games at Anchor

Cala Portals Vells, Mallorca

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The goings on!

When we wake up in the morning to bird song from the shore, we are almost entirely alone in this beautiful Cala; just a couple of other sail boats bobbing about.  We gaze up at the surrounding headlands that are tree covered and verdant and lush.  There is a lone worker rearranging sun beds and cushions on three newly swept little beaches nestled in between promentories.  Beach goers will arrive later by car or on foot.  The view out to sea across the Bay of Palma is clear and cloudless.  Bliss!

 

On the southern most headland are incredible Phoenitian cavesIMG_3239[1] which have been here for 2000 years and where there is an amazing shrine carved into the limestone rock. IMG_3244[1] There is a tomb tucked away in there too and cavernous rooms that go back far under the surface and are cool and damp.  The ground is sandy under foot and above there are only the tiniest of stalactites illustrating how little water makes its way through the rocks to the cave.

 

Huge square arches have been cut to let in as much light as possible and you can really imagine an ancient community of people living here, safe and invisible from marauding pirates.  Around them there would be access to water, sea food and some limited vegetation as well as the chance to do some hunting of wild boar, wild goats and other mammals that would have lived in the densely wooded areas around here.IMG_3030[1]

So, breakfast IMG_3243[1]can be enjoyed sitting on the deck in serenity.  The lapping of the waves, the wind wafting the branches of the trees, the sun twinkling on the water and the sea bream darting beneath the surface of the azure sea.

 

Then the fun begins.  Being only 8 miles or so from Palma de Mallorca the day boats and tourist glass bottomed boats start to arrive.

 

One or two sailing yachts make their way in.  Everyone wants to be as near to the beach as possible, they want to anchor over sand, where the water appears most turquoise in order to enjoy the day.

Gradually, this small Cala fills up.  IMG_3028[1]Mostly large, stealth-style, motor boats with snarling mouths and jagged shark-like anchor teeth.  Their smooth lines, glistening metalwork and gleaming gel coats glide in; shining and beaming out to the world around,

‘Look at me, haven’t I done well?’

They anchor in pole position with the aplomb and supreme confidence only those who exude success can do.  On board, heads begin to emerge like meerkats, curious to see where they have arrived.

We give them names!  The East End Bank Robbers!  The Boy Band, The Frenchies, The Oiks on the Black Boat, The Britannia Jet Submarine Day Trippers (with a slide on the side ), The Hamburgers , The Danish Bacons, The Five, No Six, Times a Day (lots of anchor practice) , The German Industrialist, The Gin and Tonics, The Sales Reps Team-Building Outing, The Boat That Rocked, The Nosy Missing an ‘I’, The German Space Invaders….

The stern hatches open and jet skis scoot out and roar off with whooping youngsters aboard, paid crew dart about like anchovies, pumping up paddle boards and lowering dinghies.

Wine, beer and food appears on sun decks to the waiting owners and friends.

There are shrieks of laughter and lots of guffawing.  Then a period of quiet whilst people digest their lunch and drink more hospitality wine. IMG_3245[1]  Suddenly, an urge for activity strikes, and  jet skis tear about, ribs and dinghies chase their wake and girls scream with delight.  Men paddle about sedately, chatting companionably  to each other, as they glide along.

 

Music starts to beat out a rhythmic tattoo and the high hat and bass compete for attentionIMG_3248[1].   People are heating up in the sunshine and the leaping, diving and jumping begins.  Increasingly daring jumps of bravado are made from higher and higher parts of the boats.  Some of those on The Sales Reps Team-Building Outing leap in naked to shouts of abuse.

Meanwhile, there is much to entertain Ian, as if naked people wasn’t enough!, as he watches and notes dropping and weighing anchor techniques.

The wind constantly shifts in the bay and so we all swing round, the noses of the boats sniff out the wind direction.  This leads to some hasty fendering as crews realise that boats are too close together and they will need to limit damage when they collide.  Luckily, most of these vessels have bow thrusters so they can avert any imminent catastrophe.  We work on the theory that we were here first so others need to watch out for us, especially as we are the least manoeuvrable.

As the sun dips down over the headland, the jet skis disappear back into the lockers and lazerettes the size of a small child’s bedroom.  Pink bodies head for the shade and more refreshment.  The sun loungers and mattresses on the beach are stacked up like the bed in The Princess and the Pea.  The shouts and shrieks gradually fade away.  Boats weigh their anchors and creep away in to the dusk.

Peace at last.

Oh, wait a moment, The Nosy but Missing an ‘I’  boat decides to stay longer and spends the next two hours tearing around the bay creating unnecessary waves on their rib.  The rest of us tut and raise our eyebrows and finally cheer a silent cheer as the drunken lot head off back to Palma.

Passage Preparation

IMG_3234[1]After two glorious weeks in Port de Soller Mallorca, we set off for our new anchorage.  An email from friend and fellow sailer from landlocked Wharfedale, has prompted me to jot down a little of what we do in preparation for a trip out.

A couple of days beforehand we look at various weather forecasts.  (Although we are looking at the forecast everyday even if we are parked up or at anchor) They all seem to be slightly different so we kind of judge the average of them all, particularly in terms of wind speeds and direction.

Using this prediction, we can access how easy a sail may be to where we want to head.

We would rather not beat into the wind if possible, preferring to wait until the wind is blowing the right way!  Also, I would prefer that the winds are manageable in strength, so up to 20kn being about my limit in terms of comfort zone.  Often, we have found that if the predicted wind speed is 20kn, once you are out there it is usually much more!!!   If it’s going to be blowing a hoodie, then we’d rather stay in port!

So, having settled on a destination which would be within range, say 25 – 50nm, we plot a course on the open CPN navigation software; putting in various way points and checking the entire route in close up for any potential hazards.

We look at the destination port in the pilot guide and take a note of the course to follow for safe entrance.    Checking the things to look out for on the headland and mouth of the harbour.  We have the Navionics App ready on the phone so we can see the plan of the marina.

In addition, we check tides and currents, if necessary, and generally make a note of Barometer readings the previous day and evening.

I always like to have a plan B just in case the wind changes and the original destination becomes more difficult to enter.  Sometimes we have to have a plan C as well!  I write down this plan in RYA fashion with a little drawing of the destination port, etc.

I open up a new ships log on the computer and fill in as much detail as I can about the weather, (from forecasts and observations) barometer, temperature, humidity, provisioning plan, etc.

Once that stuff is complete really it’s practical preparations of the boat and crew.  A visit to the shower block ashore, last minute provisioning, back to the boat, shore shoes sprayed with cockroach killer so we don’t bring the nasty little critters’ eggs aboard inadvertently. Boat shoes on, breakfast, tidy up, teeth.

Life jackets are stowed on deck in a locker, MOB alarms are worn, shoes are on feet as there have been injuries when sailing in bare feet, factor 30 (soon to be 50) sun cream is applied, jackets are to hand, binoculars on deck and water bottles filled.

We have already done the provisioning, filled the water and diesel tanks.

After our experience with the sail drive and head gasket we now complete a daily engine check (WOBBLE) and also one once we are underway.

Below decks we stow all moveable items in lockers or on deep shelves, etc, and shut all doors or pin them back.  We close and lock all hatches and lock off the heads, after we had a flooded forward head one day.

Ian switches all the instruments on; AIS which transmit our position, speed, heading and also receives the same information about other vessels in the area; VHF is tuned to Channel 16; wind, depth, speed, navigation and autopilot instruments are activated. The course is activated on Open CPN and the first waypoint is sent to the navigation instruments at the helm.  The MOB alarm is switched on.

Then we come on deck and put the engine on so it can be warming up.

We take sail covers off, attach the main halyard and check that everything we’ve moved whilst in port is back in the right place.  For example, we always put the main halyard on something so that it doesn’t clank the mast all night.  We also attach one of the preventers on the boom to the breast cleat so that the boom doesn’t squeak as the boat rocks.

Next, we stow the fenders down stairs (until we find a locker space on deck).

Now, it’s time to lift up the anchors.  When in Soller, we deployed a kedge anchor off the stern  in addition to the main anchor because we wanted to be kept facing into the swell which comes into the bay.  Also, other boats around us were moored up to two mooring buoys so we didn’t have the space to swing at anchor.  (It would have been uncomfortable in any case!)  Once the kedge anchor is recovered and stowed, we attach and hoist the dinghy and finally, lift and fix the main anchor.   Then the anchor ball comes down and the motoring cone goes back up.

Then we motor out of the port giving a jaunty wave to new friends who we are sure to meet up with again soon.

We check that the course has been sent up to the console at the helm and I make the second entry in my shop’s log noting the time of departure.

When possible I try to make an entry in the log every time we change the sails, or tack or when I remember, or when I am below decks.

So, there you go, Nick Chown, all recorded for you.  We don’t have paper charts for this area which is a shame, because I prefer to use them and see the whole route in detail.  It’s also good to be able to plot your positions on it regularly as a back up to electronic stuff.

From starting to lift anchors, etc it was at least 45 minutes ’til we motored out of the bay.  It would have been longer but luckily the dinghy winch decided that it would continue to work just long enough to pull up the dinghy on to the davits after a teasing halt to its smooth action. Another thing to add to the repair list that grows on a daily basis!

As for parking…that’s a whole other story!!!

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Well Deserved Coffee Time

First week in Portugal

We arrived in Faro ridiculously early on Sunday 6th March and drove straight to Vila Real de Santo Antonio, which is a small town on the Portugese Spanish border, right on the river Guadiana.  Top job today was to complete the handover of Linea.

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We went straight to our lovely Air BnB apartment in town and got settled in there briefly. Then, we walked round the corner to the marina where we met up with Pim Blokland, from whom we had bought the boat.

After a quick coffee, we set off to the boat and soon Ian and Pim were talking boat technical details.  Having had such an early morning, I am not so sure how much of the important information that Pim had to relate actually went in but Ian was taking copious notes and hopefully that, together with a memory surge, will prove useful in time.

Helpfully, Pim met us the following day for our trip down to the boat yard.  The tide and currents here in the river are quite ferocious and so his help was very much appreciated.  The survey had thrown up an issue with the sail drive, which is the gear changer for the engine.  It was faulty, which meant that it wouldn’t change from forward to reverse without switching the engine off first!  Now,
normally that wouldn’t be too difficult to cope with, but, for an added challenge, the ignition switch had decided to work to rule and would only switch on, not off!  So, I was in charge of delving into the Volvo Penta engine housing to manually switch off, if need be.  My RYA diesel engine course was already proving to have been money well worth spending!

The marina staff assisted in our manoeuvres out of the tight space on the visitor’s pontoon.  We were spun around so that the bow was pointing in the right direction and off we went down the pontoon and sharp left out into the bumpy waters of the river.  I was suddenly and inexplicably at the helm.  Before long we arrived at the jetty of the boat yard some 500m down stream.

We were all in position.  Ian on the mooring lines fore and aft.
Me down by the engine, ready to switch off manually in case we needed to change gear.

Suddenly, I heard a shout and saw that Ian was dangling from the pulpit, clinging on with hands and feet, at the front of the boat having made an unsuccessful leap to the jetty.  I rushed forward as best I could; leaping over fenders, sheets and deck paraphernalia on my way to reach him.  He calmly asked me to take the mooring line from him so he could pull himself up.  He tried to swing up and out, over the pulpit but the overhang (or his strength to weigh ratio) was too great.  Conscious that he couldn’t hold on for much longer, I suggested that he simply slid in under the pulpit on to the deck to safety. I pulled his jeans legs, practically disrobing him in the process, but at least he was safe!  The lads from the yard raised an eyebrow but there was barely a flicker of concern or amusement or shock at his predicament.

Soon we were tied up, despite the currents and choppy waters conspiring to prevent us.

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Then a huge machine progressed towards the yacht.  An enormous sling machine that rolled into the water and scooped us up, raising us up so that we were swinging free and dangling, suspended metres from the ground.FWIP 1

 

 

 

 

 

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Dangling suspended above the water.

The whole contraption took us out of the water on to the hard and we were thoughtfully provided with a ladder to climb down.  It seemed precariously high without water around.

Although the boat was only moored for eight weeks or so, and was not  sailed or moved at all, it was astonishing how many barnacles had grown on the hull. The yard was to spray clean the underside of the hull and scrape all the barnacles off.

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A (slightly blurred) collection of barnacle animals.
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Barnacled bottom!
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Ian enjoying polishing his hull but not enjoying the price of the UV polish. It would have been cheaper to coat it all in Ambre Solaire!

We were to polish the top sides of the hull with special UV resistant polish

and clean and sort out below decks so that when our boxes (15 boxes) arrived, we would have actually found spaces for our stuff to go!

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The Forepeak Cabin – masses of storage under the double bunk.
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The starboard bunk cabin. Lots of stuff in here already.

 

After a very busy day, we headed back to the apartment and grabbed a bite to eat.  Both of us were nodding off by 8pm so gave up the battle and went straight to Bedlington!

Up and at ’em in the morning and back to the yard.  I continued my mission below decks and Ian headed off to the Volvo garage in Spain to be briefed about what the engine needs. Time flies.  The day is done.  We repeat the process the following day.

All day Thursday Ian carefully began the delicate process of refitting the propeller blades and shaft to the sail drive that had now been repaired and replaced.

Now, I have no clue about propellers, but I can safely say that whoever invented this piece of technology, was a serious genius.  The precision engineering is amazing.  Each individual propeller has an optimal angle at which to be fitted so that when it rotates it provides maximum propulsion.  Ian and I spent a couple of hours sitting under the hull trying to make sure that the props went back on the shaft at precisely the right angle.    Never having done this before it was a steep learning curve and there was always the faint shred of doubt that the prop would stay in situ once the engine was put on.  A significant conundrum is that, of course, we could not test either the sail drive or our careful replacement of the props until we were back in the water and needed both to be in full working order!

On Thursday evening we received a call from the delivery company who were about to deliver  our boxes of stuff to our rented apartment.  After a brief negotiation they agreed to drop off the consignment at the boat yard.  They drove the van straight to the boat and off-loaded the pallet.  All beautifully tessellated, stacked and cling-filmed by Mr Paul Brennen – Many thanks.

FWIP 13We had all of them up on deck and lowered into the forward hatch in ten minutes flat!  Fantastic!  This saved us so much work, walking up and down the lengthy pontoon in the marina from the apartment.   We were made up!

During the course of our five days in the boat yard we began to pay attention to the surroundings whilst having our morning coffee.  Over the road opposite was a lovely evergreen wooded area stretching down to the beach front and back towards town.  All along the street into town there is a mixture of buildings, some businesses in full swing, others derelict.

We noticed whole families of people living in semi-repaired lean-tos against the tall walls of the building next to us.  There were probably three or four families, with grandparents, children and babies all living in a small community.  They had a water supply from the fire hydrant.  Plastic sheeting flapped and flew  from their roof tops.  A Shetland pony tried to snuffle around in the scrub for some grass. They had a horse and cart, bicycle, three cars and a shopping trolley for a full range of transport options.FWIP 10

There was also a pack of dogs, I counted twelve, roamed around the encampment.  One dog was tied up to a post.  Whenever its owner went off out of sight it barked incessantly and loudly and rapidly for HOURS.  I couldn’t believe its stamina.  The poor dog must have been exhausted and stressed thinking that it had to bark until it’s master returned.

Nobody remaining in the encampment batted a eyelid, despite the shrill edge to the dog’s bark.  Our raised position on the tarmac in the yard amplified the sound and soon it was slicing through our heads and becoming unbearable.

We checked the times for the next high water and as soon as our propeller was fitted back on we were ready to make an exit.

Although our fire extinguishers had returned from being tested and serviced, our life raft , VHF radio and EPIRB were still to be returned.  Nervous times lay ahead since we had to test our new sail drive and propellor without any of the normal safety precautions being in place.  We both put on life jackets and luckily, had a hand held VHF radio from home.  With some trepidation we were lowered back into the water and from the jetty were able to briefly check that the engine was performing, the propeller blades remained in place and the sail drive, changed gear and didn’t leak.

I was dispatched below to check whether any water had entered the hull.

‘YES! I can see water!’ I yelled with a panicked shout up to Ian,over the noise of the engine.  The lowering was stopped and the engineer from the yard came aboard.  He concluded that there had already been water in the bilges that was disturbed by being at funny angles in the sling.  Nothing to be worried about!

So we continued to be lowered completely into the water, revving the engine forwards and back.

The lads released the lines and we were  on our own.  We were both anxious.  However, gradually calming down as we motored steadily up river towards the marina.  Ian asked if I’d like to take a turn up stream to the suspension bridge.  All I want is to get back to dry land!  We turned into the marina and the dock master was there to help us tie up.  I have all the mooring lines prepared for a nifty leap onto the pontoon from amid ships, but there is no need for those heroics on this occasion.

On Saturday we feel we deserve a day off so we head off to Seville.  There is an IKEA there and also a fair chance that we can find a bar to watch the England game in the Six Nations Rugby.  IKEA was incredibly busy.  We spent far more than we intended, on not very much and subsequently have found a fantastic shop in Vila Real selling all that we bought and more!

But Seville more than made up for the trauna of shopping.  It  is beautiful.  The weather was a glorious twenty nine degrees.  We came up out of our underground car park and there in front of us was an Irish pub showing the rugby.   We had loads of time for a proper stroll round the centre of the city before heading off to watch the match.FWIP 14

A great result and the perfect end to our first week.

Buying a boat – it’s all about compromise

We have come to learn that buying a boat is all about compromise. A centre cockpit boat generally has a large aft cabin with a queen size bed you can get out of either side, but the cockpit tends to be smaller; mass production boats such as Beneteau are lighter therefore better in the light winds of the Med and Caribbean but less than optimal in big seas; longer boats, more living space but higher marina fees and bigger sail area to handle when short-handed; and so it goes on. Of course, for us, price was also a big consideration.  Continue reading Buying a boat – it’s all about compromise