Alghero, Sardinia, with the Clements-Hunts.

Glorious Sardinia

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Alghero from the harbour entrance.
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Flying buttresses between the houses in the narrow alleyways.
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Pretty tiles on the church dome.

On the Sunday we walked around the town IMG_3195and returned to the dinghy at about 1pm.   We stopped for a chat with Andy and Denise Hurley on Comet, our acquaintances from Soller, who have lived in Pateley Bridge…so, practically from The Shire.  They invited us for a drink.

‘How kind,’ we said.  ‘Just the one,’ we said.

But at 2300hrs we poured ourselves into our dinghy and zigzagged our wobbly way back to Linea out in the bay.   Well and truely ‘Hurley-ed’!

New Mastaclimba in action with Chris's help
Ian putting his new MastaClimba to good use in the harbour.

We spent almost an entire week anchored in the bay, thoroughly enjoying the cool winds that blew into the boat as the thermometer rose to a high of 35 degrees.  One morning was spent trying to mend a leaking toilet.  One day was devoted to fixing the sewing machine.  One morning to fixing a leak on the impeller faceplate.   You know what they say about living on a boat?  It is all about sailing the seven seas, meeting interesting people and doing maintenance in exotic places!

In the harbour, we met Christopher, a local Sardinian, who is the self-appointed custodian of the Town Quay.  He speaks excellent English and is clearly an Anglophile.   His favourite drink is tea.  (Milk, two sugars)  We were assured by Christopher, and by Andy and Denise, that it was perfectly legitimate to park on the town quay and that as long as you used your own lines there would be no charge.  However, there would be no services (water or electricity) either.

So, we planned to come in on the Friday so that we would be alongside when the Clements-Hunts arrived.  IMG_3189We edged into the tight spot in the far right corner of the quay.  I jumped ashore immediately to go to the coast guard office but it was closed.  We thought that they might have been on a siesta so I planned to pop back later.

In the mean time a huge pantechnicon truck drove up the wide quay and gradually a whole stage set up was constructed in front of our bow.   In town, posters declared that there was to be a gala with various famous Sardinians, so we were hoping for great things.

Still no sign of the coast guard.

We dressed the boat in her finery and plugged in the fairy lights on the bow and settled down for a fabulous concert, viewing from our special front row seats.Sard1

A wicked trumpeter raised our hopes and we smiled smugly at each other.  Then the compère came on stage….he was still there, waffling on half an hour later!  The saving        grace was a couple of numbers by an incredible tenor, who finished his (short) set with Nessum dorma, followed, after a further interminable chat, with a couple of other singer’s numbers.  The sound check had proved to be more interesting than the main event.  Judging by the audience’s response to the chatter, they weren’t all that impressed either!  Ah well…at least it wasn’t raining, or muddy, Gillly and Stephen.

Ali, Paul and Jojo arrived on Sunday morning.  It was so lovely to see them.  We stocked up on provisions, went off to find a bar showing the Wimbledon Final (Yeah!  What a joy to watch Andy Murrey’s high quality tennis! )

Next morning, first thing, the coast guard came to us and began asking questions.  I am sorry to say that my paltry Italian wasn’t up to the job but fortunately Alison speaks it fluently.

There were lengthy and rapid discussions and finally it transpired that the coast guards office was not in the building clearly labelled ‘Coast guard’ on the quay front.  We promised we would go immediately to see the officials.  Our combined charms and Ali’s incredible Italian soon had Fabrizio the head coast guard smiling and joking.  We were forgiven for parking in the wrong spot and had to promise to leave by 1100hrs We followed our instructions to the letter in radioing the coast guard to let them know that we had left our mooring.

We anchored back out in the bay so that we could have a bite to eat and put the dinghy back on the boat.  Then by early afternoon we set sail for BosaClem2 about thirty miles down the west coast of Sardinia.

We had a good quiet sail down there and anchored in 8 metres over sand and weed tucked in behind a huge newly built breakwater.

It was incredibly hot as the sun angled its rays right at us under the sun awning.  We spent a lovely evening swimming and snorkelling around the boat.  Jojo and Paul even swam over to the rocks and back.  We had some nibbles with pre dinner drinks and then between us, rustled up an enormous chicken and chorizo stew. Clem 1

Despite the anchor alarm going off in the night as our anchor dragged slightly through the weed, we had a comfortable night’s sleep.  In the morning we took the dinghy into the town and walked for quite some time before finally finding a bin in which to chuck our rubbish.  As we crossed a huge river bridge we glimpsed the surreal sight of two elephants chomping on hay, in a field beside the river.  The animal circus was in town and they clearly had a wide selection of animals, including lions, tigers, giraffes and zebras.

After a cooling drink we decided to head back to the boat.  A vicious maestrale wind was forecast for the back end of the week.  We wanted to be tucked back in against the town quay, safe and sound against the predicted 30 knots of wind.

As we sailed north, hurrying back to Alghero, the wind increased and we we tonking along at a rakish angle with all the Clemmies taking turns at the helm. Sard8 Ali and Jo It was exhilarating.  We did have time for a little keel hauling of the naughty crew members!  Clem5

However, I discovered on trying to use the loo (heads) on the leeward side of the boat that the sink had been slowly siphoning water and the whole vanity area of the forward heads was awash with water.  I shut the door!  We’ll deal with that later, I thought.

Later on, I checked on our heads at the back of the boat to discover that they were awash with water that had been siphoning up out of the loo!  The shower room was full of water.  Nice! CLem11 floodWe are learning that it is important to close sea cocks when the water is washing the windows (port lights).

As previously instructed we called the Harbour Master.  He allocated us a spot on the right hand side of the harbour against the Town Quay on Bha Sanita. We went to see the coast guard to double check that this was correct.  He assured us that as long as we were 10 m from the corner we were absolutely fine.  We settled in for the night and at 0830 hrs in the morning the coast guard was round at the boat demanding to know why on earth we were parked back here when he had expressly told us that it was an emergency area and was not to be encroached!

We explained about the 10m rule.  He seemed mollified, but minutes later returned with a tape measure.  Alison and Ian decided to go back to the Coast guard office and just see why there was this confusion and seeming lack of communication between members of the same team.

In typical Italian style, Ali upped the ante and became more heated in her vocabulary and her delivery.  More hand waving went on and she raised her voice.  Almost immediately the Fabrizzio, the head coast guard with whom we had talked on our first visit, appeared and calmed the situation.  He assured us that if we moved to the spot on the east edge of Bha Doganale we could stay for an additional 5 nights with no further interference.

We prepared to move.  Ian was worried about reversing out of a very tight gap between buoys and boats so I was detailed to be in the dinghy to work as a tug and pull a rope to help steer the stern round.  Paul was on slip lines.  Jojo on video!  I tried to pull the designated rope but succeeded in giving myself a rope burn as it slipped right through my palm.  Then, I tried to get round the starboard side of the boat to push it away but in a rush and a panic crashed into a yacht and the quay!  I managed to turn the throttle fully and nearly tumbled out of the dinghy backwards, as my feet came off the rib bottom.  After I heard myself shrieking and a gathering crowd of onlookers openly laughing at my Laurel and Hardy antics, I scooted away to pull trailing lines out of the water.  A lunge to grab the rope nearly had me over the side but I recovered before that embarrassment took place.

Finally, I pushed Linea’s port side so that she neatly slotted alongside the quay in her new position.  I jumped ashore, heart racing, pulse thumping and blushing from head to toe.  Luckily, Jojo’s video camera had been pointing the other way.

So,  the maestrale duly arrived and even in the harbour we noted wind speeds in excess of 30knots.  We had a noisy night with water slapping the hull and fenders squeaking against the wall, but we were so happy to be here in the thick of the ‘passegiato’ where families stroll up and down the quay in the evening breezes.  Our main activity over the next few days was people watching.  Fantastic!

All too soon it was time to say farewell to the Clemmies. Clem12 They are off for a week in a villa on terra firma.  We slipped quietly away from the town quay, waving goodbye to Christopher, and anchored back out in the bay. (More on that another time.)

Mallorca to Sardinia

Goodbye Mallorca!

Crossing DH & CP

We landed back in Mallorca and jumped in a cab to take us back to Soller where we met up with a wobbly pair of sailors (David Heane and Chris Plumb) who were to be joining us for the leg of our journey across to Sardinia.

We had ear-marked Monday as the day to prep and wanted to set off on the first sector to Pollensa where we were intending to do the provisioning.  However, the mechanics had not completed the work we had hoped would be done whilst we were away and, in fact, we had to wait for a spare part to be delivered.  When it arrived at 1500 the mechanics discovered that it was the wrong one!  Ah well,  they  made a temporary fix which will do fine for now.

We anchored in the bay and were treated to a fabulous last sunset.
Crossing 6 Leaving Soller last sunsetLater, we were able to watch the Iceland England game.  Upsetting to be out of Europe twice in one week!

The next day, we prepared to set off to Pollensa and had a good days sailing although a good deal of tacking was involved.  We motored into the bay, anchored and were doing a smash and grab raid on the Euroski supermarket by 2030hrs, prior to heading to Ambrosia for a slap up paella.

We slept well, stowed all the provisions and set sail for Sardinia around 0900hrs.  Unfortunately, our delay leaving Mallorca meant that we had to miss out a stop in Ciutdadella, Minorca, which we had been looking forward to.

We decided to all be up for the day time watch and after supper at 1900hrs, the first pair would take the first watch from 2000hrs til 0000hrs.  Chris and I were awoken with a cuppa and as I popped up through the hatch at 0000hrs.  I was amazed to see such an incredible tent of stars above us.  The sky was clear and the Milky Way above was like a dark carpet dusted with an arc of icing sugar.

We motored for a while and as the wind picked up decided to put out the head sail.  The wind was fairly light and coming from the East, but close hauled we made decent progress and it was mesmerising to sail along in the absolute darkness gazing at the stars and watching the lights of Minorca recede behind us.  Crossing 2We silently parted the waves as we sailed under a huge and intricate pergola of stars, the phosphorescence gleaming in our wake.  Not another soul was out on the water near us.  Suddenly, from nowhere – a sailing boat appeared right on our nose!  She had her full sails lit up from the deck, presumably so we would see her.  She was approaching so fast that I altered course to be sure to pass her by.  I decided to call Ian.  He came up on deck still bleary-eyed with sleep and looked hard at the oncoming vessel.  Peering through the binoculars minutes earlier I had been convinced that I could see rigging.  Ian took a careful look.  ‘Ah!’  He announced, visibly relaxing.  ‘It’s the quarter moon coming up over the horizon!’  and off he went back to bed!

We handed over to Ian and David at 0400hrs after what seemed like a very brief time.

We managed to sleep in between watches but at 0700 I woke to hear Ian fiddling in the engine housing.  On further investigation, it turned out that the engine was not drawing in any water to cool it down.  impellor probsThis meant that there was an issue with the impeller.  Ian removed the impeller face plate, and wriggled the impeller out.  Immediately he noticed that some of the blades of the impeller had disintegrated.

 

We had a spare one in stock and so Ian changed it and refitted the gasket and face plate ( under my supervision). Thank goodness for our diesel engine course.

Luckily, the water started circulating again and we breathed a collective sigh of relief being 100 nautical miles from any land! Throughout this time, we had managed to continue on our course, sailing along nicely.

We had a slap up breakfast of ‘kitchen sink omelette’ and strong coffee and enjoyed the rest of the day sailing out further and further from land.

The following night we made good progress and awoke to an incredible sunrise. Crossing 8 There was another sail boat off to our port side (Red Rooster) and we had a radio chat with them to check what they knew about the weather forecast.  They too were heading for Alghero, albeit, much faster than us.  We anticipated arriving at 1200hrs.
We had a calm and safe crossing in decent winds and slight seas and were very pleased that it had not proved to be any more challenging than that.  Lovely!

DH IM & SH Sardinia 2016

The crossing took 50 hours, 22 of which we motored.  The top speed was 8 knots and top wind speed was 12 knots.  Total distance 250 nautical miles

Job done!  Many thanks to David New Courtesy Flag Italyand Chris rossing 13 CPfor their help, energy and company.  It was a thoroughly enjoyable trip.

 

On arriving in Alghero, We anchored in the bay in 3m of water over sand and weed, luckily finding a sandy spot to lay the anchor  and narrowly missing a bunch of giant clams tucked in amongst the weed on the sea bed.  The wind was mild and the bay flat calm.   We put the boat to bed and set off into the town to find somewhere to watch Wales in the Euros.  As we approached the Town Quay we spotted Comet neatly parked alongside.  After brief chats about Andy and Denise’s crossing from Minorca.  We wandered off into the beautiful old part of town and found a pizzeria in which to watch the football. David, with his Welch connections, was suitably delighted with their win.

After a leisurely start the next day, we bid farewell to David and Chris and started to prepare the boat for our next set of visitors.

Proud Parent Interlude

GRAD8

Our ‘Lass’ of 2016

Lugging a huge bike bag and our, albeit, compact hand luggage backpacks along the sheltered quay to the bus stop at 10am in full sun is not the recommended start to the day!  Luckily, the bus was air conditioned so I managed to regain my thermostatic equilibrium.

We swooped down into Palma’s gleaming underground bus station and we’re delighted to find that it was just a quick ride up in the lift to ground level and the bus to the airport.

We emerged, disoriented in the day light and scurried for shade like lizards.  We boarded the No 1 Airport bus,  Ian having to get on at the back door because of his bike bag being too large to fit in the front.  After a little way we decided to check that this was indeed going to the airport. Ah! No!  Wrong direction!  So we had to lumber off the bus and stagger back to the beginning.  To add salt to the wounds, we had to pay again for the airport bus that was going in the right direction. Plus, Ian received a right ear wiggling for boarding at the wrong door.

The rest of the journey was uneventful for us, although we did arrive a little late and had to wait until the very end of the baggage reclaim to pick up the bike.  Amelia kindly volunteered to come and pick me and the bike up whilst Ian and Keira went to fetch the tiny hire car we had ordered (which embarrassingly turned out to be not so tiny after all!!!!)  Many thanks, Meels!

We were bowled over by the greenery of the scenery.  Particularly of Threshfield, the Wharfe and Linton.  Just lovely.GRAD2

After a proper cup of Yorkshire tea, made with Yorkshire water, and by Yorkshire folk we were fully revived and raring to go to the weekly quiz night in Grassington.

Can’t say that I did much actual quizzing but thoroughly enjoyed catching up with everyone from the gang.

On Thursday, Keira and I walked over to Linton to go home and retrieve a few items of clothing for our day at the graduation.  It was lovely to see how the garden had come on and to see how well Jon is looking after the house.  Items found; we met up with Ian in the Fountaine, approved its new outdoor livery and had a nice chat with Chris and Nat and had a quick bite to eat then headed back to the Vyvyans to say a fond farewell.

We had a major debacle with the postal voting forms for the referendum.  They had all arrived in Oxford after Keira left to go to Spain so we were unable to complete them!  We were very upset not to be able to exercise our hard earned right to vote but there was nothing we could do.

We drove on to Longridge to stay with Ian’s parents GRAD3for a night before driving down to Oxford.

GRAD6We were woken to cries of dismay from Keira early on Friday morning when she heard the news about the outcome of the referendum.  The people had spoken and we will have to get on with it and live with the consequences but she has just completed a degree in French so one can sympathise wiGRAD17ey ho!!!

We had a quiet night in Oxford on the Friday and then were up early Saturday as we were advised to arrive two hours before the start of the graduation ceremony.  So plenty of time to collect gowns, meet some of Keira’s friends and take lots of photographs. Good fun despite the rain.GRAD21

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The ceremony itself was just over a hour long.  There were speeches from the head of the Governing body, and from the vice chancellor, then the presentations were made.  All topped off by an amusing speech from Paul Mayhue – who has scripts for The Vicar of Dibley and Mrs Brown’s Boys among his credits. GRAD24

Apologies for what might seem like crowing, but it’s not often your daughter is awarded a first class joint honours degree in English and French Studies.  She also won the prize for achieving the highest marks in English Literature.  (She was well chuffed with the £50 cheque that came with the prize.)

GRAD7She has worked conscientiously and with great determination.  Of course, we are thoroughly proud of her achievements and are still glowing at thoughts of how much she has grown in confidence and capability over the years.

(Proud parent moment over a thanks for your indulgence!)

Next day, after another round of emotional goodbyes we flew back to Mallorca.

 

Guest Blog – Degree finished , time to relax.

K12After a not so pleasant-Magaluf holidaymakers-infested-plane journey from Oxford to Birmingham to Palma, Keira and Ian were waiting at the airport with open arms on a warm Saturday evening. We drove to the marina (Club Nautico Palma) where Sarah was waiting on the boat and preparing a cup of tea for my arrival. This was my first experience staying on a boat so it was a great learning curve.

The next day we made use of the facilities at the marina where Keira and I spent an hour in the gym catching up about our holidays in both Cornwall and Spain. Later that afternoon we received our results from university, we were both very pleased and we all celebrated on the deck with the sun setting in the background with Ian and Sarah’s hidden away cava!

Whilst we were in Cabrera, we made the most of the beautiful National Park by exploring the island by foot, walking up to the lighthouse and the castle that dates back to the 14th century. We also did lots of snorkelling and saw a huge clam and many sea breams. Every evening we were spoilt by Sarah’s delicious meals that she barely let us help prepare- what a treat! It was in Mondrago where I had my first Paella of the holiday, followed by a lemon cheesecake looking out onto a deserted beach at dusk- beautiful! After dinner we got on the dinghy back to Linea where we spent one more night before sailing to Calla de s’agulla. After doing our routine yoga on the top deck, we enjoyed our daily muesli and yoghurt for breakfast in the sun before kayaking to the beach, AKA German version of Magaluf! After people watching, sunbathing, bat and ball competitions and swimming, we kayaked back to the boat to have some aperitifs before our night out in the town.

Ian kindly took us ashore and Keira and I got lost in the streets that were aligned with bars and clubs that all looked the same. We had a lot of cocktails and a lot of fun, and being the only British in the whole resort we suspected! Ian collected us at 5am equipped with jumpers for our ride back to Linea, thank you Ian!! The next day, we woke up hungover and unaware that we had travelled 25 miles to Pollenca! The best thing about meal times on a boat is that there is a possibility you can have fresh fish caught from the sea that very day… Sarah caught a sea bream, so we had ceviche with salad for our dinner- delicious! Sunday was my last day before returning to the UK so Keira and I spent the day on the beach, determined to beat our score with bat and ball -we got to 200 I think! Monday morning we went ashore and said our goodbyes leaving behind blue skies and sun, I took a bus to Palma airport and returned to the UK to rain and grey clouds, I had the blues to say the least!

What a fantastic holiday, filled with laughter, fun and games, and wonderful company. Thank you Ian and Sarah for such a brilliant and memorable experience, I will be back soon!

Lucy Anne Hunt

More visitors

IMG_3021[1]On Tuesday 7th June we motored sailed round the northern tip of Mallorca to head back to Port de Soller.  We were about to complete our first circumnavigation of the island, meet up with all the Vyvyan family IMG_3308[1]and pick up our new comfy, comfy mattresses for the front cabin!

We had a tranquil sail round and I am almost loath to tell you that Ian was working on his all over tan!  Much to my amusement, he sat at the helm in his deck shoes, Gilly hat and birthday suit!  Hmm….an interesting style.  (No Picture!!!)

It was lovely to be back in Soller.  We anchored near the swimming buoys right opposite the Hotel Esplendido – a great name for a hotel!CADV17

 

We had a lovely few days pottering around, catching up with our new sailing friends and chilling with the Vyvs. IMG_3107[1]IMG_3312[1]

On Friday we had to depart fairly early to head on round towards Palma, where we were going to pick up Keira and her friend Lucy.

We had decided to spend a night in Cala Portals Vells again and duly anchored.  After a late supper we crashed out only to be woken by urgent tapping on the hull at 0400hrs.  Ian leapt up and went up on deck to see what was what.  A middle-aged Mallorcan man was swimming in the bay, wearing a head torch and pulling a life buoy behind him on a long strap attached to his yacht.  He said only one word…’Tipping!’ But with sufficient anxiety and panic to spur us into immediate action.

It was such a dark night, we couldn’t make out anything, there being no moon or shore lights to help us see.  We deployed our dinghy in record time and Ian set off into the gloom whilst I shone our fantastically strong flood light on to the other yacht.  It soon transpired that their anchor had dragged in the strong winds that had built up in the night.  The boat had been pushed back until it’s keel was sitting on the sand near the beach.  Luckily, they had not been pushed to the rocks lying menacingly on either side of the small yellow strip.

The shadows cast by the search light made Ian believe that there was another stricken yacht and crew wrecked up on the beach which served to add to his sense of urgency in sorting out the first boat quickly, but later, on closer inspection turned out to be just shadows and a vivid imagination.

First, they attempted to push the small yacht off the sand using the dinghy.  The keel was too deeply embedded and so Ian thought of enlisting the help of another yachtie and their tender.  The nearest other boat was a HUGE catamaran called Le Passion 60.  Ian knocked repeated on their hull and finally managed to raise one of the guests.  Ian explained the need for assistance but the man stated that he was not the skipper and no one came forward to help.

Ian returned to the troubled yacht alone. Next, they tried using the kedge anchor to winch themselves forward, but that was hard work with a manual winch.  Finally they tilted the whole boat to one side by pulling hard down on the main halyard from the dinghy and this, the swell coming into the bay, together with a bit of luck, allowed them to pull the boat off the sand.

They re-anchored near by and we agreed to listen out for them on the radio should they need further help.  I brewed up some coffee and we gave them our last few biscuits, which they were very grateful for, as they had no intention of going to sleep again after their trauma.

We were so pleased to have been able to help them and they were very glad that they hadn’t had to call out the life boat because, as local Mallorcan sailors they would have been mightily embarrassed.

They left for Palma at 0800hrs and we told them that we would be there later on in the day.

After checking into the Real Club Nautico Palma and being issued with our blue wrist bands – Paul Brennan, take note! We marvelled at the range of facilities, including pool and gym, that we could use.  Just look how close to the cathedral we were now.K23K10

We collected the rental car and set off to do the shopping before heading to the airport to collect Keira. K22 This included an additional 50 meters of anchor chain in preparation for the eastern Med. Weighing in at 75 kg this presented a bit of a challenge to get on board. We tried to find a petrol station that would allow us to refill our LPG bottle but no joy, and, in the extra time it took to find this out, the Palma half marathon had started and the one road we needed to be on to get back to the Marina was closed!   We spent a frustrating hour in the car trying to find our way back and finally decided to just go straight out to eat.K6

Later, Ian went to the airport to collect Lucy, Keira’s friend and we all crashed out.  Next day we spent nearly an hour circling near the fuel pontoon for an opening only.  When we were about to motor in to take the place of Taira they radioed us to let us know that the fuel station had now closed for the day!  Humff!K12

So off we set.  We arrived in Ensenada de la Rapita in the evening, and, after an slight issue with the anchor deploying itself quite close to another boat, we finally managed to sort out the errant remote control and anchor a safe distance away from others.

It was a fairly bumpy night in the large open bay but there were only two other boats and so it was certainly peaceful.  We motored into the fuel pontoon at La Rapita Marina and were able to top up fuel and water, empty our bins, visit a chandlery, use the facilities plus have a pleasant chat with the marinero who had a can of beer tucked into the water cage on his push bike!

So, suitably stocked up on everything, we set off for aK13 lovely sail to Cabrera.  An archipelago of islands comprising the Cabrera National Park, south of Mallorca.

 

We had reserved a buoy there through the National Park website and it was a very straightforward process to pick up the yellow buoy and line.

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What a stunning place.  We were able to walk up to the castleK11 at the top of the hill, walk to the lighthouse over the other side of the island, use the military cantina for a bite to eat and a jug of sangria and most importantly, use the loos!

 

K17We explored the coves and beaches of the bay in the kayak and dinghy and spotted enormous sea bream and other large fish.  We also saw a number of enormous, giant clams, softly opening and closing their scalloped lips.  Strangely there were no shells on the beach at all.  I had a quiet go at fishing with my newly constructed line (following your useful advice, Nick) and threw in my decoy bait, then my hook and line, and yes, quick as you can say, sea bream, I had a HUGE one on my line.  Foolishly, I lifted the fish up out of the water on the line and you can guess what happened.  The fish wriggled off the hook and disappeared back to the shoal.

We enjoyed a relaxing few days here in the utter peace and quiet.

Our next big sail was to head back up the Eastern coast of Mallorca.  We wanted to head for Pollensa eventually, so we made it to Cala Mondrago which was a good half way house and thought it would be a nice place to enjoy a bit of civilisation.  We had run out of cooking gas in the morning so had been denied a morning cuppa, and with no prospect of cooking our supper, we had to go ashore.

We set off walking up the road and met a sweet English couple from Poole in Dorset.  They told us that our best bet would be one of the beach restaurants.  So we about-faced and headed back to have a nice meal overlooking the deserted beach.

Next morning, we set off to do some provisioning and to find gas in nearby Cala D’Or.  We jumped on the bus and enjoyed the scenery as we drove through increasingly touristy areas.  We were keen to find breakfast and sat in a little cafe on ‘the grid’, ordered eggs, etc. and it was only then that I realised that I had dropped our mobile phone.

Ian retraced our steps to the bus stop, I went to enlist the help of the tourist information office, who phoned the bus company to no avail.  Keira was able to see the whereabouts of the phone on Find My Friends.  It appeared to still be in Cala Mondrago.

So we completed our chores and ate our breakie and grabbed a taxi to take us back to the boat.  On arriving at the Cala the phone appeared to have been moved.  Keira was despatched to negotiate its recovery.

It transpired that two German women had found the phone on the floor of the bus.  Instead of handing it to the driver, thinking that it must belong to someone from Cala D’Or, they held onto it in order to take it back to Cala D’Or that evening!  They were wandering around the park and beach in Mondrago and making it difficult for Keira to find them.  They were about to get back on the bus to return to Cala D’Or when Keira finally caught up with them.  They gave us the phone and we thanked our lucky stars!

Phew!

So, panic over, we went back to the boat and because the forecast was not good for the beach day that we’d planned we decided to crack on to Cala de S’Agulla.

We anchored up near the beach and the next day the girls kayaked ashore to spend a day relaxing on dry land.  Within minutes the entire beach, and every piece of sand was occupied by Germans.

They were surrounded by chanting, beer drinkers.  I think they relished the opportunity to do some serious people watching and sat there enthralled.  We joined them for a bite to eat at lunch time and had bat and ball and frizbe competition later in the evening.

It was as if some one had rung the end of day school bell, because the minute the sun started to disappear over the hill the beach cleared.  The beach maintenance guys sprang into action and the sand was swept and spruced up and sun loungers re-arranged neatly for the following day.

This is the best part of a beach day.

Back at the boat we had a Pimms followed by yummy supper.  The girls decided to go out into town.  Ian gave them a ride in and they staggered back to the dinghy at 0500hrs!  And were fast asleep as we set off back to Pollensa later that morning.

Strong winds and torrential rain having been predicted for Pollensa in the afternoon, we wanted to be anchored safely before it arrived and so that Ian could go ashore to watch the rugby.  Typically, the wind arrived early so we had to hang about a bit whilst the storm blew over.  He did managed to see the last half of the game.

K18 K19 K20 K21

Now we had the chance to do some window shopping around Pollensa and suss out the buses for Lucy’s return to the airport.

We saw a little more rugby and decided to eat out on Lucy’s last night at a lovely looking restaurant called Ambrosia.

Next morning, we were refilling our completely depleted water tanks and petrol supplies before heading back round to Port de Soller when we saw the sea plane again and I managed to grab a couple of pics.  Looking forward to our brief sojourn in the UK for Keira’s graduation ceremony and to vote for the EU referendum.

Happy days!

The boating adventures of a Yorkshire couple