Ibiza and mainland Spain again four an a half years on! Late September 2020

We had a great crossing to Ibiza.   We miss having our own personal crew  already.  Not to mention The Travel Tapes  videographer.    You will have to make do with just my photographs now. 

We were delighted by the incredible anchorage on the North West coast. Cala Grosa was spectacular.  The sedimentary rocks had been twisted and folded into extraordinary sculpted patterns.  My geological advisor Glen Ward tells me that this occurs when the rock is wet and therefore more ‘plastic’ and pliable.  The tectonic plate that Ibiza sits on was subject to massive forces as it collided with neighbouring plates. The solid rock is corrugated into wrinkles, runkles, crinkles, crimps and pleats to astonishing effect.

The stars were amazing and the sun rise well worth the early start but, oh, it was a rolly night.

We made good progress the next day and called into San Antoni de Portmany for a fuel stop.  Thence to a beautiful bay a short distance away.  We anchored in pristine clear water.  At 14m deep we could clearly see the bottom. We had a calm night in strong wind, the low headland providing perfect protection.  We set off for the mainland at first light with a few other boats in sight. 

The marina and harbour in Denia is huge but pleasant.  We had a lovely dinner out and gorgeous showers in our own individual bathroom!

We had arranged to meet Gwendoline and Glen (Friends from Marina de Ragusa) for lunch in Javea so we attempted to find the bus station.  We had left a little bit late and were struggling to reach the bus station in time to catch the 1200h bus.  We thought that it might be possible to pick the bus up on its route out of town.  We stopped a passing lady and I asked her in my Spanish/Italian mix where the bus stop was.  She replied in faultless English that she didn’t think there was a bus to Javea but that she was going there in 20mins and would be happy to give us a lift!

Well, we happily accepted and were given a scenic ride over the Montgo mountain to Javea.  So thank you to Jet, Funeral services director, from www.adiosconamor.es.

We had a great catch up lunch with the two Gees – such fun and a fantastic meal at La Siesta.

The next day, we set off to Altea.  The wind had really picked up and the seas were lumpy.  Initially, we were on a run with the head sail only.  We were tonking along at 7.5kts…which is very fast for us as we normally cover the ground at about 5kts on average.

The wind shifted a bit so we decided to put the main sail up on the third reefing line as the wind was consistently 25kts and gusting to 30kts.  We reduced the size of the head sail too and still we were washing all the windows and bombing along.  I don’t really like the tipping up so I was doing my usual clinging to the winches in the cockpit.  Anyway, we made record time and arrived at Altea with plenty of time for a shower, pre-prandial complementary cava and a stroll before dinner.  Nice to be on terra firma.

The trip to Alicante by complete contrast was just “Mary Poppins – practically perfect in every way.”

We had 10kts just b’aft of the beam and all the sails up.  We were fairly level the whole way and still made excellent speeds of between 6 and 6.5kts all the way.  Lovely.

We booked into the Real Club de Regatas in Alicante for two nights so we could go and see the Volvo Ocean Race Exhinbition and have a good explore round town.

The exhibition was very interesting.  The town was a surprise with its wavy esplanade, palm trees, statues, bourgainvilla, gorgeous seafront buildings, le Barrio or old quarter, the Santa Barbara Castle and the Bull Ring, theatre and cathedral.

 

 

The next leg was a biggy from Alicante to Cartagena – about 65nm.  We arose at 0530h and dodged through cargo and fishing vessels on our departure from the port without incident.  Using our fancy new radar together with the AIS, we could ‘see’ all the vessels and obstacles around us in the darkest predawn dark of the night.

Then the sun finally made an appearance and we could relax a little. 

The last two hops passed without incident.

We have now arrived at our winter berth in Almerimar, on the costa del Sol where we are trying to sell the boat.

I have volunteered at a Oxfam type shop here and will start Spanish lessons soon.

 

 

We hope that more liveaboards will arrive over the coming days and that we are able to meet the community soon.

There are as always, lots of boat jobs to keep us busy until the boat sells.  We need to lose weight and try to get fit too.  As per….!  We are hiring a car to explore the area around us and will try to keep you all up to speed n ow that I have a working blog again!

Thanks for reading!

 

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